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  1. #11
    Join Date
    13th June 07
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    Hoschton, GA
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    Or the other side of the coin:

    KILT :- Black Watch, or Hunting McGregor both in modern colours.
    JACKET :- a BBSB Argyll with 5 button waistcoats/vest.
    SPORRAN:-Black seal semi formal & chain, or Black seal full dress & chain.
    SHIRT:- White button down.
    TIE:- Regimental
    HOSE :- Any
    FLASHES :- Any
    I will be wearing Black brogues and a sgian duh. Fine.

    As you will be the center of attention, there is nothing wrong with going a little over the top. If you went to see Frank Sinatra in concert, he was usually wearing a tuxedo even though the audience was completely casual. It's part of the show.

    Just my two cents.
    Cheers,

    David
    "I'm not crazy about reality, but it's still the only place to get a decent meal."
    Grouch Marx

  2. #12
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    2nd March 11
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    Onondaga Township SW Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdinSteve View Post
    This - https://www.merriam-webster.com/word...istory-meaning - might help to clarify for you. Essentially at one time dinner was the main meal of the day taken at midday and supper was a meal taken in the evening. In Burns time the evening meal, which is what is a Burns supper would have been called just that - a supper.
    I love these insights into local culture. In my own home we called the mid-day meal lunch but I do recall many of our farming neighbours in eastern Ontario called it dinner. I worked on these farms during the busy calving and haying seasons. In those homes it was the largest meal of the day often a big roast of beef or chicken followed by fresh made pies and deserts. Then the old folks settled into a brief nap or "lie down" after "dinner" then were up and working hard until milking was done and the cows and other livestock were put away for the night. As evening arrived there was a light meal "supper" of leftovers for the people before bed.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    26th November 18
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    Central Pennsylvania, USA
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    Thanks for the link, EdinSteve. It was probably dinner that they called the mid-day meal and not supper.
    Verbing weirds language.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    16th September 10
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    In south Georgia, growing up in the late 40s and 50s, we ate breakfast, then dinner, and much later, supper.
    We also wore brogans and galluses and warded off rain with bumbershoots.

    When I am called upon to present the address, I consider the haggis to be the center and more particularly
    the focus of the group's attention. I am not interested in being that. I wear a clergy kilt, blue shirt (not a
    button down), tie, gray or blue lightweight sweater (jumper), HOC hose with tied garters. Others might be in a
    black PC, a Jacobite period outfit, Saxon suit, or slacks with or without a jacket or tie. All in the same room.
    My clothing reflects my choices and has nothing to do with Rabbie. I am not honoring the fact that he was
    born in Ayrshire, I am honoring the fact that he had a tremendous gift with words and a deep understanding that
    appearance and station in life are not the value of someone. That value is in who one has chosen to become.
    And that person, taken in whole, warts and all, has value.

    It has been a while and a half since I trod the boards and a fair while since I stood in front of a classroom or
    at a conference podium, but I am comfortable still with not needing to dazzle or impress. My job is to share
    information in such a way that folk find it helpful and remember it. And hopefully, reasonably enjoyable. Their
    need to judge me (or not) is not my problem. I give it my best shot and move on.

    My other job always is to discern the value in any and all I encounter, not to judge them by where and how
    I grew up and/or how most would perceive their ability to color within the lines.


    Fair use note: the question was advice. The above is less advice than personal opinion. Not to be confused with
    How Things Are Done In Polite Society.
    Last edited by tripleblessed; 11th January 19 at 05:55 AM.

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  6. #15
    Join Date
    3rd September 18
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    Scotland
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    Quote Originally Posted by tripleblessed View Post
    When I am called upon to present the address, I consider the haggis to be the center and more particularly
    the focus of the group's attention. I am not interested in being that.......
    My clothing reflects my choices and has nothing to do with Rabbie. I am not honoring the fact that he was
    born in Ayrshire, I am honoring the fact that he had a tremendous gift with words and a deep understanding that
    appearance and station in life are not the value of someone. That value is in who one has chosen to become.
    And that person, taken in whole, warts and all, has value
    And, of course, Burns himself encapsulated that sentiment so eloquently in A mans a man for a that -

    What though on hamely fare we dine,
    Wear hoddin grey, an a that;
    Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
    A Mans a Man for a that:
    For a that, and a that,
    Their tinsel show, an a that;
    The honest man, tho eer sae poor,
    Is king o men for a that.

  7. #16
    Join Date
    16th September 10
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdinSteve View Post
    And, of course, Burns himself encapsulated that sentiment so eloquently in A mans a man for a that -

    What though on hamely fare we dine,
    Wear hoddin grey, an a that;
    Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
    A Mans a Man for a that:
    For a that, and a that,
    Their tinsel show, an a that;
    The honest man, tho eer sae poor,
    Is king o men for a that.
    Precisely what I was thinking as I was typing. My mother often quoted Burns in her attempts to survive my childhood.
    A small part of all she gave, but treasured.

  8. #17
    Join Date
    30th April 17
    Location
    north wales,uk
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    Looking for advice.

    Well Father Bill thank you, thinking of going with the grey tweed and go from there. Edinsteve thanks for the input, I do realise that Burns was a lowlander but the guys & lasses expect me to wear the kilt and I thank you for the good luck.
    Regards
    Dirk95

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  10. #18
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by Singlemalt View Post
    ...our farming neighbours in eastern Ontario called it dinner...it was the largest meal of the day often a big roast of beef or chicken followed by fresh made pies and deserts. As evening arrived there was a light meal "supper" of leftovers...
    Exactly as I remember it as a little kid in West Virginia, but our family only did that on Sunday. The main meal was after Church, around 1pm or 2pm, with the light supper of leftovers shortly before bedtime. (Which came early for us, because everyone was up at 5am every day.)

    Saturday for some reason was a more ordinary lunch and dinner thing, as I recall.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  12. #19
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdinSteve View Post
    I have never been to a Burns supper where anyone was kilted...
    As you've probably seen the Lowland/Highland distinction is generally not known about over here in the States. Kilts are perceived as the Scottish National Dress and everyone trots out their Highland finery for Burns Suppers. It's generally black Prince Charlies for all, fly plaids and brooches and dirks and lace everywhere.

    I went against the grain years ago and wore tweed. I was the only kilted person not in full Evening regalia. (I had to be in kilts- I'm the piper!)

    I have noticed a trend of slowly Highland-izing the rest of Scotland over the years. A big step (it seems to me) was putting the entire Scottish infantry, Highland and Lowland alike, into Highland Dress. I've heard this was strongly resisted in some quarters.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  14. #20
    Join Date
    5th January 19
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    As one with probably the least experience in these matters, I was surprised to see so many people saying to make it more casual. Every Address to the Haggis I've watched on YouTube, everyone was in PCs with fly plaids. I came away with the impression that a Burns Supper was a black-tie affair.
    I believe myself to be always operating within reasonable boundaries of sanity.

  15. The Following User Says 'Aye' to AbuMaia For This Useful Post:


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