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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Tailoring an argyle jacket.

    I was wondering if it was possible to have the sleeve with a gauntlet cuff of an argyle jacket shortened without ruining the jacket? Let’s say I found a jacket on eBay or somewhere similar but the sleeves were too long. How would I go about it? I probably wouldn’t be doing it, but a local tailor.
    “Never wear anything that panics the cat.”- P.J. O’Rourke
    “People will stare. Make it worth their while.”-Harry Winston
    “A man should look as if he has bought his clothes (kilt) with intelligence, put them (it) on with care, and then forgotten all about them (it).” Paraphrased from Hardy Amies

  2. #2
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    While lI don’t know the particulars of how it’s done, I’ve had the sleeves shortened on several eBay-purchased gauntlet cuffed Argyll jackets by a local alteration shop. I can’t imagine it would be a challenge for an experienced tailor or seamstress.

    Take the jacket to the shop and they’ll have you try it on and will mark up the sleeves with chalk and/or pin them up to your satisfaction, then will make the alterations required. It shouldn’t take too long or cost too much (at least in my experience).

    Cheers,

    SM
    Last edited by ShaunMaxwell; 22nd November 21 at 06:20 AM.
    Shaun Maxwell
    Vice President & Texas Commissioner
    Clan Maxwell Society

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  4. #3
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    I am absolutely no tailor, but I think a good tailor might even remove the sleeve and shorten it at the shoulder. I've been surprised by some of the ways my fellow has successfully made a variety of adjustments.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Canadian Sinclair.

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  6. #4
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    I think it depends on how your arm fits into the sleeve shape - over the years I have recut sleeve caps to keep most of the sleeve as it was, shortened the cuff and removed a piece from behind it as the sleeve was long below the elbow and the cuff made in proportion, or cut the cuff off and shortened the sleeve then reattached the unaltered cuff. The last one was the most difficult as it was a mass produced jacket.

    Tailor made garments with some age seem to be the easiest garments to alter. Some modern garments are impossible to work on as the seam structure is all that is keeping the threads together.
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

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  8. #5
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    I think a lot depends on how the cuffs are made.

    Here are three Argyll jackets, the left and middle ones have a false cuff sewn all around onto the sleeve prior to the back seam of the sleeve being sewn. I suppose it would be possible to completely remove the cuff and move it higher. But not knowing if there's fabric underneath the cuff, or if it's possible to remove the cuff cleanly, I couldn't say whether it would be possible to lengthen the sleeve.

    The jacket on the right has the cuff as a separate piece, thus it would be simple to move the cuff higher or lower on the sleeve.



    Here you can see that the cuff is lined in satin like the rest of the jacket.

    Last edited by OC Richard; 24th November 21 at 05:28 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  10. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    I am absolutely no tailor, but I think a good tailor might even remove the sleeve and shorten it at the shoulder. I've been surprised by some of the ways my fellow has successfully made a variety of adjustments.
    I had two jackets with gauntlet cuffs shortened in exactly this way. Turned out beautifully.

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  12. #7
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    Every time I look at that picture I think - that is SO cheating!!

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

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