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  1. #1
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    Highland DRESS use during Proscription

    View near Loch Rannoch, 1749 by Paul Sandby. Just two years after the Act of Proscription that forbad Highland clothes the two highlanders are shown wearing feileadh beag, tartan hose and a little plaid. Further evidence that the Act was not wholly effective or uniformly applied.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. The Following 5 Users say 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
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    This scene also includes surveying (elevation and angle measurement). There should be notes available of the men participating, their job title, area surveyed, maybe notes on the connecting land owners, weather and odd notes of interest the surveyor may have added. I would love to get my hands of those books.

    If this was a government mandated survey, there would have been a dress code (recommended) for the workers (maybe not "day" or "walk-on" temporary help).

    Thank you for the items you provide Peter.
    Last edited by Tarheel; 4th April 17 at 03:37 PM.

  4. #3
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    Soldiers, perhaps? I believe the painting shows a survey party at Loch Rannoch during the Roy Military Survey of Scotland 1747 - 55.

    http://www.clydeandavonvalley.org/hi...nd-avon-valley

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  6. #4
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    Sandby was IIRC an engineer, and his works are a treasure trove of mid century solders dress details.

    I'm going to check a database of redcoat images to see if there is a write up on this work.

  7. #5
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    You gents have just given me my summer reading and research project. As a retired surveyor, this may fill my plate with fine dining.

  8. #6
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    A few close ups, and another Sandby that is not often seen in color








    Sandby's Jacobite Prisoner image


  9. #7
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    Proscription didn't apply to those in government service, right? If these men were part of a military surveying party, I'm not sure that this is any sort of evidence one way or the other.

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  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    Proscription didn't apply to those in government service, right? If these men were part of a military surveying party, I'm not sure that this is any sort of evidence one way or the other.
    Proscription did not apply to those in the Army, those in Government service but not military were covered by the Act. These two might have been soldiers although the 42nd and 64th (the only two Highlander regiments at that date) wore the belted-plaid rather than the feileadh beag. The garments are similar to those in Sandby's drawing of the post-Culloden prisoners so he may have just included these to identify the surveying as working in the Highlands.

  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    These two might have been soldiers although the 42nd and 64th (the only two Highlander regiments at that date) wore the belted-plaid rather than the feileadh beag. The garments are similar to those in Sandby's drawing of the post-Culloden prisoners so he may have just included these to identify the surveying as working in the Highlands.
    I've no doubt that your eye for detail is better than mine with respect to Highland clothing, but do you think Sandby's paintings can be taken as accurate down to this level of detail? The post-Culloden painting appears to show the two prisoners wearing kilts with no pleats, and the tartan on the bias. Would that have been a type of kilt worn at that time period?

  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    I've no doubt that your eye for detail is better than mine with respect to Highland clothing, but do you think Sandby's paintings can be taken as accurate down to this level of detail? The post-Culloden painting appears to show the two prisoners wearing kilts with no pleats, and the tartan on the bias. Would that have been a type of kilt worn at that time period?
    Clearly kilts with no pleats is a contradiction but a feileadh beag with folds would be closer to what Sandby showed.

    The tartan on the bias is obviously nonesense and reflects the difficulty a number of 18th century artists had with depicting tartan. The drawings of the Black Watch mutineers are a good example and their yellow and red tartan bears no resemblance to the Government sett. It may have been the case that th colouring was done later in the same way that it was for the later McIan prints.

    What seems less understandable is why Sandby would have shown a feileadh beag and a sparate rolled plaid (much like the army campaign blanket worn by non-Highland soldiers) if the individuals had been wearing a feileadh mor. The style of dress he showed was certainly in use at the time of the '45 as for example, the images from Loevestein Castle attest.

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