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  1. #21
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    I think the large drum you mention is the Lambeg Drum, an it is associated with the Orangemen. It is supposedly the world's loudest drum. The lambeg drumhead is much thinner than the bodhran heads typically were. Interestingly, Seamus O'Kane, the originator of the tuneable bodhran, started using lambeg skins for bodhran dumheads several years ago, and they ave gained a wide acceptance for the greater range of tone they provide. The Bodhran is a frame drum, which is defined as a drum whose depth is less than half its diameter. It is thought to have started out as a grain winnowing-type vessel that, with the skin added, became a drum.

    I've been playing in 2 to 3 sessions a week here in Atlanta and really enjoying it - not to mention the free drinks that go along with it!
    Convener, Georgia Chapter, House of Gordon (Boss H.O.G.)

    Where 4 Scotsmen gather there'll usually be a fifth.
    7/5 of the world's population have a difficult time with fractions.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by turpin View Post
    I think the large drum you mention is the Lambeg Drum, an it is associated with the Orangemen. It is supposedly the world's loudest drum. ... Interestingly, Seamus O'Kane, the originator of the tuneable bodhran, started using lambeg skins for bodhran dumheads several years ago, and they ave gained a wide acceptance for the greater range of tone they provide. ...

    I've been playing in 2 to 3 sessions a week here in Atlanta and really enjoying it - not to mention the free drinks that go along with it!
    I've been curious to hear one of those (Lambeg drums) live and get a first-hand look at it -- I've wondered if it might work with my percussion-oriented Celtic-fusion band. Thank you for suggesting the name of the drum -- I'll look into it.

    What surprised and rather dissatisfies me is bodhran players I've seen over the last number of years playing with no suppleness to the heads, so the sound produced is crisp and pingy. Mind that I've seen some rather good players, but they leave the head such that it can be dampened with the hand and let loose with the hand for a free strike, but w/o any head treatment its crisp, tight, and un-pushable -- ultimately, they can't and don't produce the variety of sounds the drum can make. I find no enjoyment in playing drums as such either.
    Last edited by BagpiperDon; 24th October 09 at 12:05 PM. Reason: unimportant

  3. #23
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    Top end or Limerick style has become very popular recently. Players use a thin tipper and only play with the one end, unlike the Kerry style most folks are used to seeing. Some players can get unbelievably fast rolls, but it does tend to give a tighter and poppier sound.

    There is a lot of good info for those interested at https://www.bodojo.com.

    Bodhran is meant to be an accompaniment to the melody in a session, and should complement the music without standing out. The biggest sin is failing to maintain the proper timing and beat.
    Convener, Georgia Chapter, House of Gordon (Boss H.O.G.)

    Where 4 Scotsmen gather there'll usually be a fifth.
    7/5 of the world's population have a difficult time with fractions.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BagpiperDon View Post
    I've been curious to hear one of those (Lambeg drums) live and get a first-hand look at it -- I've wondered if it might work with my percussion-oriented Celtic-fusion band. Thank you for suggesting the name of the drum -- I'll look into it.
    Lambeg drums are simply very, very large bass drums for marching. I had the...experience...of seeing them one summer in Scarva.

  5. #25
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by beloitpiper View Post
    Lambeg drums are simply very, very large bass drums for marching. I had the...experience...of seeing them one summer in Scarva.
    Thanks -- good to hear about. I pulled up some YouTube vids after the name-suggestion was made earlier, but I think anything I viewed couldn't do credit to what it must be like live.

  6. #26
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    By the way, if it doesn't work out you can read my forthcoming article: How To Turn Your Bodhran Into A Banjo.


    Best

    AA

  7. #27
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    About the question as to whether the bodhran is Irish or Scottish, it seems that quite a few people don't think the bodhran is really a traditional instrument anywhere, but was sort of invented/revived/reinvented by Sean O Riada in the 1950's. The Chieftans was an outgrowth of O Riada's ensemble and was largely responsible for popularising the bodhran.

    I've been told that back in the 1920's it was called a tambourine and was actually a large tambourine complete with jingles around the rim etc.

    There's a great early recording of a famous Irish fluteplayer (Morrison?) accompanied by this instrument. It sure sounds like a bodhran, being played with a stick by the sound of it, but then from time to time the player just shakes the thing and you can hear the jingles.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    About the question as to whether the bodhran is Irish or Scottish, it seems that quite a few people don't think the bodhran is really a traditional instrument anywhere, but was sort of invented/revived/reinvented by Sean O Riada in the 1950's. The Chieftans was an outgrowth of O Riada's ensemble and was largely responsible for popularising the bodhran.

    I've been told that back in the 1920's it was called a tambourine and was actually a large tambourine complete with jingles around the rim etc.
    There's a great early recording of a famous Irish fluteplayer (Morrison?) accompanied by this instrument. It sure sounds like a bodhran, being played with a stick by the sound of it, but then from time to time the player just shakes the thing and you can hear the jingles.
    I have played one of these, Damn if they are LOUD. if those out there think a bodhran should be seen and not heard, you should hear this in the hands of some one who is just learning. We where playing it in the mid-eastern style, with out a stick. I believe they are called a Rek or Riq and are Egyptian in origin.Picture of a Riq

  9. #29
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    Interesting that I attended an uilleann pipe concert Saturday night and the all-night party/session afterwards and while there were pipes, fiddles, flutes, boxes, and whistles there was nary a guitar, mandoid, banjo, or bodhran to be seen!!!

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