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  1. #31
    Join Date
    8th June 04
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    Port Crane, New York
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    That's not quite right . The character only seems to have been used as the first of a double 's' and is found in the middle and at the end of a word. For example, the invantary (sic) includes vefsel, sicfers (the single 's' might be a c1970 transcription error), brufs and harnefs to name but a few.
    Righto! (I was half asleep and hung over from a very "festive" Burns Supper when I wrote that! ). But, "shifts" (not "shists" ) must still indeed be an 18th C. usage for shirts - at least in Scotland....
    Brian

    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." ~ Benjamin Franklin

  2. #32
    Join Date
    9th June 10
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    Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, South Africa
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    Peter, I stand corrected. As you say, the f character does occur in paired SSes, looking like fs.
    I was confusing it with the Greek usage, where the more familiar of the two forms for lower-case s always appears at the end of a word.
    Regards,
    Mike
    The fear of the Lord is a fountain of life.
    [Proverbs 14:27]

  3. #33
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
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    Crieff, Perthshire
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    Well, well. We dug out the original document and the c1970 copy that I'd been working from contained a number of errors. Most importantly, the original lists not a meeder vide plaid but a madder reid plaid.

    I take the term to mean a deeper/darker red than the pinkish shade so often seen in old tartans which was the result of a light cochineal dyeing with an alum or weak tin mordant. Interestingly, as most dark reds were also produced with cochineal I suspect that this plaid was similarly dyed rather than having been madder dyed which was usually a brick/orangey red. The owners have a dark red plaid of the approximate same date, along with some other items mentioned, so it might just be that the two plaids are one in the same. Exciting stuff.

    A wig and bonnet has also been found in the inventory meaning that we have now identified a complete set of clothes and weapons.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    14th August 07
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    Halifax, NS
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    meeder vide plaid but a madder reid plaid.
    Ha! My wide guess was right!

  5. #35
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
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    The Inventory continues to give up some great information and it now looks at thought a complete set of cloths was given:

    Bonnet
    Wig
    Coat
    Shirts
    Trews
    Underwear (Preserves)?
    Purse/Sporran & belts
    Plaid
    Boots
    Spurs
    Weapons sword, targe and pistol

    The items in bold indicate where the family still has examples of the era athough it's not known if they are the items listed. This gives us a good idea of the everyday dress of a Highland gentleman.

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