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  1. #771
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    The last book I read (The Art of Fielding) had numerous references to Moby Dick by Herman Melville. So begins again another read of the classic.
    Glen McGuire

    A Life Lived in Fear, Is a Life Half Lived.

  2. #772
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    Just finished How the Scots Invented Canada. Now Iím starting Culloden by John Preble

  3. #773
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    A retread of Gabriel Garcia Marquez One Hundred Years of Solitude,
    Glen McGuire

    A Life Lived in Fear, Is a Life Half Lived.

  4. #774
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    How the Scots Invented Canada - Ken McGoogan

    An interesting read; not scholarly in style, but interesting. This is the same chap who has come up with a couple of dozen reasons why Scotland should unite with Canada. I for one would welcome that, but it does at best seem fanciful. Might save Rex some travelling time though.

    I found this paragraph speaking of Sir Walter Scott's work amusing:

    "Inevitably it inspired controversy. Scott's son-in-law and biographer, John Lockhart praised the extravaganza as "Sir Walter's Celtification of Scotland," while the Scotsman complained that the celebration went to far in giving "A Highland complexion to the whole... as if nothing were Scottish but what is Highland." Later in The King's Jaunt, author John Prebble took this criticism further, decrying "the Highland dress and spurious tartans" as having little connection with ancient costume, and complaining that no laments were heard "for the evictions, the burnings and the white-sailed ships that were emptying the glens while the men who profited from this diaspora formed their highland societies and solemnly debated the correct hang of a kilt and the exact drape of a plaid."

    And... we debate and discuss the same things today here on XMarks!
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Parish Priest, retired Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour and clarity. Theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts and souls and a firm believer in dignity, decency, and duty. A proud Sinclair.

  5. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Father Bill For This Useful Post:


  6. #775
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    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    An interesting read; not scholarly in style, but interesting. This is the same chap who has come up with a couple of dozen reasons why Scotland should unite with Canada. I for one would welcome that, but it does at best seem fanciful. Might save Rex some travelling time though.

    I found this paragraph speaking of Sir Walter Scott's work amusing:

    "Inevitably it inspired controversy. Scott's son-in-law and biographer, John Lockhart praised the extravaganza as "Sir Walter's Celtification of Scotland," while the Scotsman complained that the celebration went to far in giving "A Highland complexion to the whole... as if nothing were Scottish but what is Highland." Later in The King's Jaunt, author John Prebble took this criticism further, decrying "the Highland dress and spurious tartans" as having little connection with ancient costume, and complaining that no laments were heard "for the evictions, the burnings and the white-sailed ships that were emptying the glens while the men who profited from this diaspora formed their highland societies and solemnly debated the correct hang of a kilt and the exact drape of a plaid."

    And... we debate and discuss the same things today here on XMarks!

    Interesting, I understood that Lockhart had been something of a critic of the event. In his Life of Sir Walter Scott, he wrote:

    Whether all the arrangements which Sir Walter dictated or enforced, were conceived in the most accurate taste, is a different question. It appeared to be very generally thought, when the first programmes were issued, that kilts and bagpipes were to occupy a great deal too much space. With all respect for the generous qualities which the Highland clans have often exhibited, it was difficult to forget that they had always constituted a small, and almost always an unimportant part of the Scottish population; and when one reflected how miserably their numbers had of late years been reduced in consequence of the selfish and hardhearted policy of their landlords, it almost seemed as if there was a cruel mockery in giving so much prominence to their pretensions. But there could be no question that they were picturesque - and their enthusiasm was too sincere not to be catching; so that by and by even the coolest-headed Sassenach felt his heart, like John of Argyle's, "warm to the tartan;'' and high and low were in the humour, not only to applaud, but each, according to his station, to take a share in what might really be described as a sort of grand terryfication* of the Holyrood chapters in Waverley ...

    * A nod to Scott's theatrical consultant for the visit, actor / playwright Daniel Terry.
    Last edited by Bruce Scott; 2nd December 17 at 03:08 PM.

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  8. #776
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    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    An interesting read; not scholarly in style, but interesting. This is the same chap who has come up with a couple of dozen reasons why Scotland should unite with Canada. I for one would welcome that, but it does at best seem fanciful. Might save Rex some travelling time though.

    I found this paragraph speaking of Sir Walter Scott's work amusing:

    "Inevitably it inspired controversy. Scott's son-in-law and biographer, John Lockhart praised the extravaganza as "Sir Walter's Celtification of Scotland," while the Scotsman complained that the celebration went to far in giving "A Highland complexion to the whole... as if nothing were Scottish but what is Highland." Later in The King's Jaunt, author John Prebble took this criticism further, decrying "the Highland dress and spurious tartans" as having little connection with ancient costume, and complaining that no laments were heard "for the evictions, the burnings and the white-sailed ships that were emptying the glens while the men who profited from this diaspora formed their highland societies and solemnly debated the correct hang of a kilt and the exact drape of a plaid."

    And... we debate and discuss the same things today here on XMarks!
    Prebble was a recorder of history from his perspective. Often biased.

    Highland dress by 1822 had evolved from pre-proscription eras just as it has through the eras since. Certainly the celebration was largely Highland (although the Highlands had to come to the Lowlands to attend it since all was centered on Edinburgh). And certainly Scott's focus was on his romantic notion of the Highland past, but Scotland benefited hugely from his ideals and they quite likely contributed in just the same measure to our modern love for what became Scotland's national costume.

  9. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to ThistleDown For This Useful Post:


  10. #777
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    Right now, I am doing some "light" reading: Niccolo Machiavelli's The Prince. It is a classic, and I think he usually gets a bad rap for the book.

    Tom
    "Life may have its problems, but it is the best thing they have come up with so far." Neil Simon, Last of the Red Hot Lovers, Act 3. "Ob la di, Ob la da. Life goes on. Braaa. La la how the life goes on." Beatles

  11. The Following User Says 'Aye' to kiltedtom For This Useful Post:


  12. #778
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiltedtom View Post
    Right now, I am doing some "light" reading: Niccolo Machiavelli's The Prince. It is a classic, and I think he usually gets a bad rap for the book.

    Tom
    Actually, a good book about management and leadership. When you finish it, take a look at Theodore Caplowe - Managing an Organization. It's a very short, practical Machiavelli handbook for managers and leaders in our age.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Parish Priest, retired Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour and clarity. Theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts and souls and a firm believer in dignity, decency, and duty. A proud Sinclair.

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