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  1. #61
    Join Date
    24th March 15
    Location
    Eugene, OR
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    Well, I went out for a bit today. Our one local Irish pub had a "permit" to close down a block of E 17th. The Fire Department Pipes and Drums were the entertainment of the day (they are a Highland band, wearing the MacKenzie tartan). I wore a kilt (khaki) with green hose and a green shirt (the tuba group I play for wears green) and saw one other kilt that I believe was a Fraser. I did get a pint of Guinness. Well, a 12 oz. cup. And got to hang out with a good friend, also a retired cop.

    I went home and served up lamb stew and shepherds pie to a group of friends. And had a shot of Bushmills 12.

    My heritage is that of an American mongrel. Irish, Scotts, Welch, English and German, to the best of my knowledge.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    12th March 17
    Location
    Irving, Texas
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    All assimilate clothing, it is human nature. The only reason all men do not wear a kilt is lack of confidence, for it is often a superior garment for some conditions. We want to blend in because we are heard animals yet stand out because we seek individuality.

    I grew up in East Texas, where the south meets the west. Many people consider themselves cowboys yet never worked in anything remotely close to animal husbandry. Besides the clothes they wear looked nothing like anything like an original cowboy.

    Take the schemag, many now wear these practical scarves because we were exposed to them in Iraq. The America version is slightly modified but it is now part of our culture.

    I sometimes get the local garment of countries that I have worked in. I have a dishdasha from Iraq and a boo boo from Senegal. They remind me of those places even when just hanging in the closet.

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  4. #63
    Join Date
    24th July 07
    Location
    Spotsylvania, Virginia USA
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    An interesting article on the assimilation of the Irish boiled dinner in to the United States culture.

    http://www.history.com/news/hungry-h...-and-meatballs

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  6. #64
    Join Date
    19th May 11
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_Carrick View Post
    People should wear what they want; are they being tracked by paparazzi and going to be splashed all over the newspapers?
    A green tie, shirt or sweater is a sufficient statement if they wish to mark the day. I never need a reason to wear my kilt and wear it on this and any other day if the mood strikes.

    If you wish to make Irish people cringe, however, use "Patty" as a contraction of Patrick. It is ghastly!
    It's Paddy from Padraig.
    slàinte mhath, Chuck
    Originally Posted by MeghanWalker,In answer to Goodgirlgoneplaids challenge:
    "My sporran is bigger and hairier than your sporran"
    Pants is only a present tense verb here. I once panted, but it's all cool now.

  7. #65
    Join Date
    4th November 16
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    South Jersey, US
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    Here's my take on it: you're celebrating the Briton who converted Ireland to a Greco-Judaic religion on behalf of Rome, so what's the big deal if some Scottish elements get thrown into the mix? Irish folk music is likewise full of Italian fiddles and Greek bouzoukis -- as well as the modern inclusion of the German-American version of the Spanish guitar -- and Scotland is way more closely connected to Ireland than any of those. I'd hypothesize that Highland bagpipes became part of the American St. Patrick's festivities because they're less expensive and more widely available than the uilleann pipes, and both much easier to play while marching and be heard over a cheering crowd and thus better suited for a parade. And the kilt is just what pipe bands typically wear; indeed, I've had more than a few strangers see my kilt and ask me if I play the bagpipes (my favorite response: "No, I play the bass.").

    Also, I have a tendency to call the holiday "St. Pat's". Is that an abomination too? I mean, unlike Patty, Pat can be short for both Patricia and Patrick. Though I've never referred to St. Andy's or St. Dave's...
    Last edited by Dollander; 19th March 17 at 03:50 PM.
    Kilt n. A costume sometimes worn by Scotchmen in America and Americans in Scotland. –Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary

    Scotch is a drink; Scots are a people. –Stuart Rankin

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  9. #66
    Join Date
    24th March 15
    Location
    Eugene, OR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dollander View Post
    ... And the kilt is just what pipe bands typically wear; indeed, I've had more than a few strangers see my kilt and ask me if I play the bagpipes (my favorite response: "No, I play the bass.")....

    I have the same experience; I tell them I play the tuba.

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  11. #67
    Join Date
    29th October 16
    Location
    British Columbia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale-of-Cedars View Post
    I'll just leave these here... some of the reasons I love this city.

    CelticFest Vancouver http://www.celticfestvancouver.com/

    [/URL]
    This was a great festival, a lot of fun and very well attended! (The sun shining for the first time in 6 months helped, I'm sure.) There were many people, if not the majority, obviously NOT Irish in attendance and everyone had a great time. It made the day feel not like an exclusive reunion for a particular culture but the sharing of experiences and active example of multiculturalism.

    The website doesn't show it well but there was a "Salute to Scotland", making up one of the three stages that went all day long on Saturday. It was a lot of fun to see on one end of the street highland dancers with a piper, then on the other end a group of Irish dancers with fiddlers.

    There were a few kilts in attendance- and not just from the three or four pipe bands playing. Unfortunately, my kilt wasn't ready for its big reveal but my kids wore theirs and were not out of place!

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