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  1. #31
    Join Date
    24th September 04
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    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
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    No one seems to have mentioned that Deer and Elk are essentially red-green color blind. Their color vision is limited to the short blue and middle green wavelengths of colors. As a result, deer and elk can distinguish blue from red, but not green from red, or orange from red. You can hunt in blaze orange as deer and elk see this as gray or brown.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    26th September 05
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Q View Post
    5 The red coats were not the scarlet most people think of until 1881, but a much duller red madder colour.
    For the Enlisted men, yes,

    Sgt's had mock scarlet, still dyed with madder, but with more bleaching of the wool prior to dying.

    Officers had the bright scarlet coats.

    Here is a good breakdown of reproduction military broadcloth and kersey of the 18th and Early 19th centuries color matched to surviving samples

    http://www.historicaltextiles.com/Colours.html

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  5. #33
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
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    Crieff, Perthshire
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Q View Post
    My opinion of the tartan / camouflage discussion is.

    When you dyed your wool, you used the materials around you to produce the dyes. Therefore if you are in your home area your dyed wool will match the surrounding scenery whether bright or not ( for the most part ). It's that time of year at the moment SWMBO is busy collecting for her weaving group.....
    Natural dyestuffs are often a completely different colour to the dye colour they give. It is also a fact that imported dyes were widely used and preferred for tartan in the 18th century because of the range and quality of their colours.

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  7. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    Natural dyestuffs are often a completely different colour to the dye colour they give. It is also a fact that imported dyes were widely used and preferred for tartan in the 18th century because of the range and quality of their colours.
    For the rich yes, but the majority of the highlanders were poor, in remote areas. Getting expensive imported Dyes for clothing when you are struggling to feed and house yourselves I would have thought unlikely for the majority.
    "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give"
    Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill

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  9. #35
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Q View Post
    For the rich yes, but the majority of the highlanders were poor, in remote areas. Getting expensive imported Dyes for clothing when you are struggling to feed and house yourselves I would have thought unlikely for the majority.
    Actually we have no idea just how widespread the use of imported dyestuffs was amongst the Highland population but visitors accounts, those by the likes of Martin Martin and Gaelic literature all suggest the Gaels delighted in bright colours with red being especially prized. This mid-18th century specimen is possible a good indication of the type of pattern that might have been used by the less wealthy.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Unnamed C18th - Clan Stewart_02a.jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	176.7 KB 
ID:	31899

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  11. #36
    Join Date
    20th May 17
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    An interesting article in Scotland clans that talks a bit about dyes, proscription and the resurgence of the tartan.

    http://www.scotclans.com/brief-history-tartan-scotland/
    Last edited by Me cousin Jack; 17th September 17 at 01:12 AM.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Me cousin Jack View Post
    An interesting article in Scotland clans that talks a bit about dyes, proscription and the resurgence of the tartan.

    http://www.scotclans.com/brief-history-tartan-scotland/
    A useful handrail but beware, it contains a number of errors such as that tartan was banned after Culloden.

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  14. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    Actually we have no idea just how widespread the use of imported dyestuffs was amongst the Highland population but visitors accounts, those by the likes of Martin Martin and Gaelic literature all suggest the Gaels delighted in bright colours with red being especially prized. This mid-18th century specimen is possible a good indication of the type of pattern that might have been used by the less wealthy.

    And when I argued this with a Jacobite reenacting group, I darn near got kicked off their FaceBook page.
    Vestis virum reddit

  15. #39
    Join Date
    27th October 09
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    Kerrville, Texas
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    figheadair, can you tell me more about that tartan? I love the colour palette. Your photo name seems to suggest it is an unknown tartan, but also says Clan Stewart. Is this actually a clan tartan, or just an old unnamed tartan?

  16. #40
    Join Date
    11th July 05
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    Quote Originally Posted by IsaacW View Post
    And when I argued this with a Jacobite reenacting group, I darn near got kicked off their FaceBook page.
    What Jacobite reenactor group were you debating with that took such umbrage? Just a matter of curiosity, because I belong to a Jacobite reenacting group (Appin Historical Society, portraying part of the Stewart of Appin clan regiment in the '45). Unfortunately, I used to do Facebook, but not at present, so I'm not likely to get into it with this group. It will be handy to know, however, if I ever meet them at an event.

    I will say that most reenactors do their due dilligence in the matter of researching all aspects of their portrayals, but there are always the new guys (or the lazy ones) that have not yet done so and can pass along inaccurate information from the romantic mythology that is flying around out there.

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