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  1. #1
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    Considering making a second kilt

    I made my first utility style kilt last year and I am currently thinking about trying my hand at it again. I have been looking at pictures of kilts, however, the pictures lack the details I am trying to figure out because they are always either on a model, on a mannequin or folded. Would any one care to share pictures of kilts spread open? I'm trying to figure out how over and under aprons are done and how they are supposed to look. I'm trying to study apron deep pleats and reverse pleats. I thought I read somewhere about a kick pleat but I'm not sure what that is and I'm trying to figure that out as well. I'm sure there is more than one way all of this is done. Any pictures, help and advise will be greatly appreciated.

    Sláinte,

    Fred

  2. #2
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    25th September 04
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    Í'll be more than happy to help but I need a little more information. There are just too many different ways to make a "utility type" kilt.
    Are you wanting to make a Casual style, a pub style or a MUG style kilt?

    Are you looking for the wider type aprons like used on more Traditional kilts or the narrow style from the Utilikilt? Or something in between?

    What type of pleating do you think you would prefer? Wide, cargo pleats, narrow refined pleats, box pleats, double box, kinguissie, reverse kinguissie? The possibilities are many and how you lay out the kilt depends on what type of pleating you want.

    Do you plan on putting pockets in or on the kilt? Taking pockets into account can change everything.

    How to you want to fasten the kilt on? You would use a bit different technique if you want buttons or snap than if you want straps & buckles.

    And do you want a trouser like waistband or a more traditional type waistbanding?

    Do you plan to have the internal structural elements like stabilizer or interfacing or will you rely on the strength of the fabric and the strength of the stitching for the strength of the whole garment. Kilt made or jeans made?
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  3. #3
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    Thought about coming to Kilt Kamp this summer? The Wizard of BC is an excellent person to learn from!! You aren't that far away!
    Kiltmaker, piper, and geologist (one of the few, the proud, with brains for rocks....
    Member, Scottish Tartans Authority
    Geology stuff (mostly) at http://people.hamilton.edu/btewksbu
    The Art of Kiltmaking at http://www.celticdragonpress.com

  4. #4
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    12th April 16
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    Mr. Ashton,
    I greatly appreciate you for offering your help and hard earned knowledge, thank you very much.

    My kilt knowledge is very limited to a Great Kilt I wear for S.C.A. events, a traditional style kilt, that my deceased wife made me years ago using the Folk Wear instructions and the kilt I made last year using the X-Kilt instructions.

    Regarding the points you brought up I really don't know what the styles are or what they look like "Casual style, a pub style or a MUG style kilt". The styles that I know are what comes up when I do a Google search for utility kilts, tactical kilts, sport kilts ... etc. and what comes up on eBay. Most of them look very much the same and I have been tempted to buy one, however, I really don't know their quality so I haven't bought one from eBay.

    I do have Ms. Tewsbury's book, but I really don't know how to hand stitch that well, the cost tartan is prohibitive at the moment and I am not Scottish through my mother's side of the family does claim some Irish ancestry.

    For apron width I am thinking something in between; I don't really think a utility style kilt would have the right look (but I could very well be mistaken), the narrow apron of "Utilikilts" are ok but for my second attempt I would like to try something in between.

    For pleating, I love the look of knife pleating (after all what swings and swishes like knife pleats) but I am not sure I want all the bulk. I like box pleats well enough but I have been thinking about reverse kinguissie. How well does reverse kinguissie swing and swish?

    I really haven't thought about pockets, I have thought more about MOLLE webbing that way I can attach various pouches.

    As for fasten the kilt on, I am more inclined to straps and buckles just due to my age and how my waist seems to fluctuate an inch or so.

    I didn't know there are different types of waistbands. Unless you mean where you wear the kilt then I am trying decide if I want a mid or low. I have watched your Youtube video on measuring. Here comes a question ... how wide of a band do you recommend for the measurement?

    I am planning on relying on the strength of the fabric and the strength of the stitching for the strength of the kilt. I plan on making it out of camo or a poly/cotton and sewing it all on my old Kenmore workhorse sewing machine.

    Again, thank you Mr. Ashton and to all who have read this far. I posted this publicly in the off chance there are others who are looking for the same information but are to intimidated to ask.
    Last edited by CavScout19D; 18th April 17 at 04:29 PM.

  5. #5
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    Let me see if I can help with some of your questions and further details of what I am asking.

    The different styles of kilt are not based on the fabric that they are made of as much as the construction techniques used to make them.

    Traditional Style - These are kilt made IAW "The Art of Kiltmaking". It is not the outer fabric that gives these garments their lengendary swish but what is hidden behind the inner lining.
    Traditional kilts have the excess fabric behind the pleats cut-away to make the back thinner. they then have a strip of stabilzer added to resist the forces of strapping them on. After the stabilizer a full floating interfacing is added for vertical stiffness. (think boning of a corset).
    A traditional Style kilt can be made with any pleating arrangement and from many different types of fabric.

    Contemporary Style - These are the kilts made my myself and 21st Century Kilts. Again, it is not the outer fabric that give these garments their swish and strength. A Contemporary may be hand-stitched or machine stitched. But may be designed to be worn lower. May have additional or different types of stabilizer and interfacings depending on how they are to be worn. But all of the internal elements are still there. Contemporary kilts are often made from alternative fabrics to wool. Machine washable Poly/Rayon and Poly/Cotton blends are sometimes used in addition to wool. And then there are the pockets. Guys gotta have pockets.

    Casual Style - These are kilt which can look from the outside like traditional kilts but will lack the internal construction elements. They may or may not have the internal liner which actually is only there because traditional kilts have a liner. Many Casual style kilts will be machine sewn and made from fabrics other than wool. The 5 yard or 'casual kilts' you often see on the web are of this style.

    MUG Style - These are the type of garment popularized by Utilikilts. These differ from the first three styles in that the strength of the garment comes from the strength of the fabric and the stitching. I call this type of construction "Jeans-made". Often MUGs will be made from Poly/Cottons and 100% cottons and have wide or Kingussie or even 'Rev K' pleating styles as the Utilikilts use.

    Pub Style - These are the least common denominator of the kilt world. These are the garments made in Pakistan and China. The tourist kilts you will find on the Royal Mile. They are made to sell for a hundred dollars or less. they are those worn often my Highland Games athletes who can destroy a kilt in one competition and need to buy another. Pub Kilts are often made from Acrylic and or Poly/Acetate blends. They may have a minimum of construction and yet still have pleats and wrap around aprons.

    What type or style of kilt you choose depends on "What do you want to do in your kilt?" If you can answer that question you are well on your way.

    A full traditional kilt will have aprons that are just over 1/2 of the wearers waist circumference. A Utilikilt kilt has an apron about 7 inches wide. in between may be aprons that are 1/3 or something else. It all comes down to the hang of the aprons and the swish. A current advertisment says that a narrow apron will fall between the legs when squatting. Well a full apron will also fall between the legs if made correctly.

    Here are just a couple of the types of folds you can put in fabric to create pleats.

    These are Knife Pleats (This is also folded to retain the full Tartan pattern - called To The Sett)


    Knife pleats again but this time folded so that a prominant vertical stripe goes down each pleat. (called To The Stripe)


    Here is fabric folded to create Box Pleats.


    And this sample is sometimes called Military box pleats and sometimes "Uneven leg box pleats".


    The wider the reveal of each pleat will determine how much fabric the kilt will use. Box Pleats will usually take about half the fabric of narrow knife pleats.
    Wide or rugged looking pleats and Kniguisse pleats will usually take about 5 yards of fabric.
    Narrow traditional knife pleats will make what we call "an 8 yard kilt".

    A traditional style of waistbanding



    A trouser type waist band.

    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  6. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  7. #6
    Join Date
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    Thank you for your help Mr. Ashton. After reading your post I believe I want to make a MUG style kilt, utilizing jeans construction with a trouser type waist band, reverse kingussie pleating and a wider apron than a Utilikilt but more narrow than a traditional kilt.

    I mainly wear the kilt I made using the X-kilt instructions as an alternative to shorts in the summer while working in the yard and hiking the woods. I kinda beat it up. Eventually, I wouldn't mind trying my hand at the other styles once I have gained skills and confidence and then making a traditional kilt. As I said previously, tartan is currently cost prohibitive due to budget and finances.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    24th September 04
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    Victoria, BC Canada 48° 25' 47.31"N 123° 20' 4.59" W
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    Tartan woven in wool may be expensive but if you would like to try Tartan may I suggest you look into the synthetic Polyester/Rayon blend fabrics.

    These are what myself and Rocky use. Totally machine washable and dryable. Very wrinkle resistant and teflon coated to resist stains.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    Tartan woven in wool may be expensive but if you would like to try Tartan may I suggest you look into the synthetic Polyester/Rayon blend fabrics.

    These are what myself and Rocky use. Totally machine washable and dryable. Very wrinkle resistant and teflon coated to resist stains.
    I don't know where to buy that from, however, I do have about 5 1/2 to 6 yards Mil-Spec three color desert camo from my service days.

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