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  1. #11
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    26th September 05
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    I seem to recall a discussion about civilian use of dicing on bonnets a long time ago, but I guess I've forgotten the details. What are the earliest examples of civilian diced bonnets that pre-date the military ones?
    Pre date, I dont think I can say that. But David Allan's Highland Wedding at Blair Castle painting from the 1780's show them being worn by both military and civilians at the same time.








    In my studies I have found the following ways to decorate the brow band and or bottom of a bonnet:

    1. Nothing; the most common, medium to dark blue bonnet with no contrasting color.

    2. Small knots of a contrasting color set up slightly from the brow band, the earliest treatment, found on a bog burial bonnet.



    3. Solid red band, set up from the actual brow band. Ive only seen this in military portraits of mid to late 18th Century

    4. Interrupted red band. Ive only seen one bonnet of this style, an actual bonnet in the Fort Ligonier collection. Red/blue




    5. Solid red brow band, something that is seen on military officers, but not on any enlisted or civilians to the best of my memory.

    6. Applied decoration of 2 color tapes braided together. Seen only on IIRC 2 1770's era portraits.

    7. Zig Zag dicing, on 2 portraits, one late 18th Century, another early 19th Century (Glengarry himself and this one: https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/15265/lot/184/




    8. 3 Color dicing, usually red, white and green, numerous portraits both military and civilian, starting in the 1770's thru mid 19th. I believe that one regiment, the 84th Royal Highland Emigrants used Red, white and a lighter blue than their dark blue bonnets.



    Alexander Robertson, 15th Clan Chief 1784



    Portrait of Donald McIntyre, 1830 by Sir Edwin Landseer

    On these last 2 styles, I know they are not hard/fast rules, during the world wars many regiments used what was available on the market at time of raising.......

    9. 3 Color dicing, red, white and black, what I would call modern military dicing, mid to late 19th cent thru today.
    10. 2 Color dicing bonnet colour and white, I think of this as civilian dicing, I don't know exactly when that style came into play, 1970's till now?

  2. #12
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    26th September 05
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    Quote Originally Posted by KMCMICHAEL View Post
    I do not mean to derail but my wool bonnet is extremely warm and impossible to wear this time of year in Texas. How is that one?
    Ive worn green(When SF Support also wore green) and maroon berets in Panama between 91 and 96. Sure it was not "Fun", but neither was it impossible. The fact that I could wear a beret and others could not, well it made it bearable.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    12th March 17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke MacGillie View Post
    Ive worn green(When SF Support also wore green) and maroon berets in Panama between 91 and 96. Sure it was not "Fun", but neither was it impossible. The fact that I could wear a beret and others could not, well it made it bearable.
    I wore a green smokey hat in 125 degrees near Glamis, CA from 88 to 96 but...dem days be over. I suspect my kilt attire for the summer will be a Tilley or Panama straw. I was just hoping to find an alternative. I have friends that wore that green beret. I purchased a few Randall's from them and developed my preference for Bombay gin.

  4. #14
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    26th September 05
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    Well, being Scottish, its pretty much like being the SOF of all the various European peoples, so a wool bonnet is just the price you pay

  5. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Luke MacGillie For This Useful Post:


  6. #15
    Join Date
    27th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by KMCMICHAEL View Post
    I do not mean to derail but my wool bonnet is extremely warm and impossible to wear this time of year in Texas. How is that one?
    In terms of wool thickness and heat retention, I suppose it's like any other. It does have an interior lining, similar to the Mackie bonnets. You could, of course, cut out the liner which would help release some heat.

    To be honest, though, it doesn't bother me to wear it in the heat. But I'm probably not the right person to ask, since I prefer to be warmer than others. I'm the guy who is always freezing in the office when others are sweating, and I'm the one who sneaks over and adjusts the thermostat up a few degrees. Heat doesn't really make me uncomfortable unless it's over 100F. With that said, however, I won't typically wear a Balmoral in the summertime. Not because of the heat, but because of the sun. I switch over to a Tilley Airflo hat that has a brim wide enough to shade my poor pasty white skin against the brutal Texas sun. The older I get, the more I worry about skin cancer.

  7. #16
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    6th June 12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    I'm the guy who is always freezing in the office when others are sweating, and I'm the one who sneaks over and adjusts the thermostat up a few degrees.
    So you're the one. I'm the guy who sneaks over and turns it down to 68 F.
    Walkman
    ___________________
    "Who knows only his own generation remains always a child." - George Norlin

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