X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb website Burnetts and Struth website Kilt Society website
The Scottish Trading Company Xmarks advertising information MacGregor and MacDuff Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website

User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    2,941
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    An rare 18th century tartan date 1748 but is it.........

    Last year the STA was loaned a plaid initialled plaid dated 1748 - discussed here.

  2. The Following 7 Users say 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    5th August 14
    Location
    Oxford, Mississippi
    Posts
    3,353
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The article states there is little fading (possible storage for dowry in a cedar chest?). Is there any indication of smoke or dust/lint build-up on the creases or folds of the cloth? My thoughts are, the fabric may have been kept in a room seldom used or for special occasions. I also wonder (since following your papers more closely) that some dating (using chemical analysis) to determine the fuel common to the household where the cloth existed longest may show up in the thread fibers. Would peat, coal or wood have been the main source of fuel, and since each leave a different residue, indicate the geographical area when woven.
    Mine are just the ramblings of a mind lost in the spinning of large handmade wheels, the rhythmic clack of pedals and the smack of shuttles darting across the loom.

    I do appreciate the work that you provide.

  4. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Tarheel For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    2,941
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    The article states there is little fading (possible storage for dowry in a cedar chest?). Is there any indication of smoke or dust/lint build-up on the creases or folds of the cloth? My thoughts are, the fabric may have been kept in a room seldom used or for special occasions. I also wonder (since following your papers more closely) that some dating (using chemical analysis) to determine the fuel common to the household where the cloth existed longest may show up in the thread fibers. Would peat, coal or wood have been the main source of fuel, and since each leave a different residue, indicate the geographical area when woven.
    Mine are just the ramblings of a mind lost in the spinning of large handmade wheels, the rhythmic clack of pedals and the smack of shuttles darting across the loom.

    I do appreciate the work that you provide.
    This particular plaid is in remarkable condition. There is no evidence smoke or dust/lint build-up on the creases or folds and unless there was heavy smoke contamnation then I very much doubt that a chemical analysis would be able to determine the fuel source used in the house 200+ years ago. That said, I don't think peat was widely used in Aberdeen and the surrounding area at the time.

  6. #4
    Join Date
    5th August 14
    Location
    Oxford, Mississippi
    Posts
    3,353
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I see your point clearly about fuel soot contamination. Being that Aberdeen is a costal community, I would think whale or fish oils would have been used as well as wood.
    Moving on, would the different dye varieties been more available in a coastal trade environment than to a weaver much further inland?

  7. #5
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    2,941
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Moving on, would the different dye varieties been more available in a coastal trade environment than to a weaver much further inland?
    It needs to appreciated that there were two sources of dyestuffs in pre-mass production Scotland; local dyes and imported ones. The latter were certainly available widely by about 1700, a century earlier for indigo, and what was used for dyeing tartan yarn would have depended on the depth of an individual's pocket. Those better off would have favoured imported red dyes because they gave more and better shades that were more light and wash fast. Gaelic poetry of the time praises red plaid above all other colours showing the penetration throughout the Highlands.

    If one looks at surviving pieces of early tartan there is no evidence to show that distance from the coast had any effect of the ability to get access to imported dyestuffs. The raw materials were dried and light weight for the volume required some would have been easily transported and traded.

  8. The Following 6 Users say 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Join Date
    21st October 08
    Location
    sterling, ny
    Posts
    114
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Such a pretty piece, hard to believe it didn't get more use, someone must have put it somewhere safe and forgot where safe was. Be a nice one to reproduce.

  10. #7
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    6,504
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    Gaelic poetry of the time praises red plaid above all other colours
    This astounds me.

    It's clear, from watching Outlander, that plaids back then were all brown and grey.

    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

  11. The Following 5 Users say 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  12. #8
    Join Date
    21st December 05
    Location
    Hawick, Scotland
    Posts
    10,859
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've just seen for the first time the article which you linked.
    Figure 2, I will be having nightmares about this! Surely the author would not de-construct a plaid which had survived intact for over 250 years. Please tell me the damaged section is either from a different piece of fabric or from a part of the original which was already damaged.
    http://www.scottishtartans.co.uk/1748_Dated_Plaid.pdf
    Regional Director for Scotland for Clan Cunningham International, and a Scottish Armiger.

  13. #9
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    2,941
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It is a very small area of damage on the original fabric. The wonders of hi res photography.

  14. The Following User Says 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  15. #10
    Join Date
    20th May 17
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for posting, enjoyed reading that, didn't know they used the cochineal bug for dying.
    If you find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck!
    ~John Steinbeck

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0