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Thread: learning gaelic

  1. #11
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    Ah yes, I can't believe I forgot Speaking Our Language!
    A really great series - they are all available on YouTube, and the LearnGaelic website I believe.
    "We are all connected...to each other, biologically; to the earth, chemically; to the universe, atomically...and that makes me smile." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

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  3. #12
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    Hi

    There are heaps of resources on the web - Colin and Cumberland is good for kids (and adults), with cartoons, games etc
    www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/colinandcumberland/

    kist o' riches http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/ has songs, which I think is one of the best ways of learning a language

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  5. #13
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    I can recommend Scots Gaelic in 12 weeks, if you stick with it and do the the lessons as prescribed you'll get a pretty good start, on written Gàidhlig at least. For pronunciation it's obviously best to be taught by a native speaker, although Speaking our Language does help a tonne.
    I have a couple children's books that I recommended in another thread, all of which can be found on Amazon. I'll list them again.
    1. 'A bheil mi beag?' By Phillip Winterberg
    2. 'Oidhche mhath, Sam' by Amy Hest
    3. 'A bheil thu idir gu math, Sam?' by Amy Hest
    When I was learning French in high school I found children's books to be a good way of learning basic grammar and conjugation. I know a few people have used 'Conversations in Gaelic and English' but I'm unfamiliar with it.

    Now, on the topic of regional dialects I have a question for those in the know. I heard somewhere that Nova Scotian Gàidhlig speakers have the purest form (by that I assume it's meant the oldest form?) of Gàidhlig. Does anyone know if this is true and if so how does it differ from Gàidhlig spoken in Scotland? Just curious, for those of us in North America, there is a Gàidhlig language college in Nova Scotia....
    "The Scots have a transportable culture, you don't stop bein a Scot just because you live in America or Australia or anywhere else."

    Colin G. Calloway

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  7. #14
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    Regarding the book, Scots Gaelic in 12 weeks. The Memrise app has included ... at least begun to include an audio complement to the book. Very helpful as I learn the nuances of the pronounciation of Gaelic.

    https://www.memrise.com/course/13351...c-in-12-weeks/

    -Slàinte

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  9. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by CamelCody View Post
    I heard somewhere that Nova Scotian Gàidhlig speakers have the purest form (by that I assume it's meant the oldest form?) of Gàidhlig.
    I don't know anything about that assertion, but I will say that coming from the standpoint of historical linguistics such a notion is something of a chimera.

    All dialects of all languages are equally old, having an unbroken chain of evolutionary forms going back to whatever language was spoken by the group of around 20,000 fully modern humans that eventually populated the world. It's hard to think that the street slang of today traces as far back as Sanskrit or Tocharian B but it does.

    For sure all dialects and languages retain archaic features, but side-by-side with these will be new things: semantic shifts and sound shifts and changes in grammar and newly coined words and newly borrowed words and who knows what else. A language only stops evolving when there's no more speech community of native speakers to use it; but that dead language traces exactly as far back as all the other languages that kept being spoken.

    It is true that when a language is divided amongst two or more isolated speech communities the old features that are retained and the innovations will vary from speech community to speech community. It's why to American ears some things English that people say sound quaint and old-fashioned, and to English ears some things that Americans say sound quaint and old-fashioned.
    Last edited by OC Richard; 10th June 17 at 06:32 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

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  11. #16
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    I have a set of PDF lessons that contain 50 lessons and some appendices, can't remember where I got them from. But anybody who wants them can have them. The lessons usually start with some new vocabulary and then exercise sentences.

    Also, the BBC used to have some free lessons that were at least good for pronunciation of you didn't like online learning.
    OblSB

  12. #17
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    A free resource is "Speaking our language" available on youtube - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...w7WABfqUFAKw_T

    Another option with downloadable text
    https://freelanguage.org/learn-scott...online-for-fre

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  14. #18
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Profane James View Post
    The LearnGaelic website is very useful, LOTs of lessons...
    Here's my pile:
    Attachment 31011

    I would recommend the 'colloquial Scottish Gaelic' due to the great website with corresponding audio files for the lessons...
    Hello Profane James
    can you provide referecen on colloquial Scottish Gealic and the website please
    Derek

  15. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DerekvG View Post
    Hello Profane James
    can you provide referecen on colloquial Scottish Gealic and the website please
    Derek
    Sure! Although it is probably best in context of listening along with the book lessons:

    http://www.routledgetextbooks.com/te...guage/scot.php

    Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/Colloquial-Sc.../dp/0415206774
    Last edited by Profane James; 31st October 17 at 03:35 PM.
    "We are all connected...to each other, biologically; to the earth, chemically; to the universe, atomically...and that makes me smile." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

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