X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb website Burnetts and Struth website Kilt Society website
The Scottish Trading Company Xmarks advertising information MacGregor and MacDuff Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website

User Tag List

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Apron shape?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Apron shape?

    Hello!

    I have decided to hand sew myself a modern kilt for the first time. I usually buy my kilts already made or wear great kilts. I am new to sewing, but I understand most of what I have to do. I am 5'9" and I need a length of 24", but I have a 28" waist with a 36" seat (got a muscular butt). How do I angle the aprons so their edges' run straight down the side of the thigh instead of falling straight down in the front?

    Any help or advice would be great. Please and thank you.

    Derek Carbaugh
    Last edited by Derekc5555; 14th July 17 at 10:49 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    7th September 14
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    794
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do you have Barb's book? You might also find some guidance in the kiltmakers forum.

    If you have a look at your purchased kilts, you will (or should) see that the apron at the bottom is wider than at the top and that the shaping out starts at a point commensurate with the fell. That allows for what you are looking for. If you like the look of a purchased kilt apron, you could replicate measurements; but truly there is more to it that that. Thus why most here who make their own kilts highly recommend Barb's Art of Kiltmaking

  3. #3
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
    Posts
    3,018
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The shaping of the apron edges will depend on what fabric you plan to use and what style of kilt you want to make.

    If you plan to use wool it will help the apron take a pleasing shape if you taper the edges outward from the waist to the hips. You will then be able to continue that shaping in a gentle "S" curve down to the hem.
    Wool has the ability to form under heat and take compound curves.



    This is an apron for a wool kilt to fit a guy 6 ft. tall with a 36 inch waist, 45.5 inch hips and a total length of 23.5 inches. That is a drop of 21.5 inches and 2 inches of rise above the top strap.

    If you plan to use a Poly/Cotton fabric or most of the other solid colored fabrics you still taper the apron edges but the edges are done with straight lines because these fabrics do not take the compound curves that will will.

    The goal when making a kilt with full width aprons is that the outer edges should fall straight down vertically at about where the side seams of trousers would be. This is why we taper the apron edges.

    If you plan on making a kilt with a narrow apron like a Utilikilt there is no need to put any shaping in the aprons at all.
    Last edited by Steve Ashton; 14th July 17 at 11:33 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  4. #4
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    The shaping of the apron edges will depend on what fabric you plan to use and what style of kilt you want to make.

    If you plan to use wool it will help the apron take a pleasing shape if you taper the edges outward from the waist to the hips. You will then be able to continue that shaping in a gentle "S" curve down to the hem.
    Wool has the ability to form under heat and take compound curves.



    This is an apron for a wool kilt to fit a guy 6 ft. tall with a 36 inch waist, 45.5 inch hips and a total length of 23.5 inches. That is a drop of 21.5 inches and 2 inches of rise above the top strap.

    If you plan to use a Poly/Cotton fabric or most of the other solid colored fabrics you still taper the apron edges but the edges are done with straight lines because these fabrics do not take the compound curves that will will.

    The goal when making a kilt with full width aprons is that the outer edges should fall straight down vertically at about where the side seams of trousers would be. This is why we taper the apron edges.

    If you plan on making a kilt with a narrow apron like a Utilikilt there is no need to put any shaping in the aprons at all.
    Is it necessary to taper from my waist to the full width of my seat? That would put the taper at almost a 45 degree angle. The top of the apron would be 14" wide and the bottom of the apron would be 30" wide. Does that sound right? I feel that is too wide of a taper.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
    Posts
    3,018
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If - you are talking about how a traditional kilt is made IAW "The Art of Kiltmaking", then you must determine your splits. The width of the apron is just over 1/2 of your waist and just less than 1/2 of your hips.

    You say that your waist circumference, taken with a tape measure at the place you wish to wear the straps and buckles, is 28 inches, and your hip circumference, taken with a tape measure at the widest part of your hips and butt is 36 inches, (and yes, that is 8 inches difference, so more taper than average) then -

    Your splits would be about - waist = 14.5" in the apron/13.5" in the pleats" and your hips = 17" in the apron/19" in the pleats.

    You apron would then be 14.5" at the bottom of the Rise tapering out to 17" at the bottom of the Fell.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  6. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Steve Ashton For This Useful Post:


  7. #6
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Steve,
    I drew out the apron with the dimensions you suggested and it looks WAY better then what I came up with before. I'm definitely going to use those measurements, and buy the book you mentioned earlier. Thank you for the help.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    24th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
    Posts
    3,018
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To find a copy of "The Art of Kiltmaking" please contact the author Barb Tewksbury. Her logo is on the right side banner of advertisers. Or you can visit her site CelticDragonPress.com.
    Barb is a member here and she is very happy when people contact her.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  9. #8
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I believe I've talked with her before. I will do so. Thank you.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    5th August 14
    Location
    Oxford, Mississippi
    Posts
    3,460
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Derek, you might consider making the waist to expand to a 32 inch waist, thus making an apron that will expand, with an extra hidden pleat that can be let out as you expand with age. This is the voice of experience from a 61 year old that once (just three years ago) had a 32 inch waist that swelled to the current 34+ inch waist.

    A girth will grow, even if the exercise (work lifestyle) should prevent the "spare tire" of age.

    I think the kilt you are building will become a favorite for a long time and even a go-to choice.

    Forgive any uncomfortable mentions of unwanted weight gain, the facts of aging are cropping up on me and all of us will have to deal with these small details.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    29th September 16
    Location
    Rohnert Park, CA, Usa
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Derek, you might consider making the waist to expand to a 32 inch waist, thus making an apron that will expand, with an extra hidden pleat that can be let out as you expand with age. This is the voice of experience from a 61 year old that once (just three years ago) had a 32 inch waist that swelled to the current 34+ inch waist.

    A girth will grow, even if the exercise (work lifestyle) should prevent the "spare tire" of age.

    I think the kilt you are building will become a favorite for a long time and even a go-to choice.

    Forgive any uncomfortable mentions of unwanted weight gain, the facts of aging are cropping up on me and all of us will have to deal with these small details.
    Haha. Thank you Tarheel. I'm only 29 years old so I'm sure I'll fill out in the next 15-20 years. I'll keep that in mind.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0