X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website Kilt Society website
The Scottish Trading Company Xmarks advertising information MacGregor and MacDuff Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website

User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    9th August 16
    Location
    Camden, New South Wales
    Posts
    143
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Cutting pleats in a low yardage knife pleat

    I have a budget 5 yard kilt from Glenisla. As was noted by Steve a few months ago, it was made to the barest minimum standard for a wool kilt. Yet, it is still made from Lochcarron Strome (as confirmed by Craig at Kilts4Less from whom I bought the kilt when I first started wearing them).

    There is no steeking or canvas interfacing. The buckles are attached directly to the wool. My intent it to take the lining and buckles/straps off and finish it properly. I have some of the same fabric on order from Lochcarron, with which I intend to try my hand at a military box pleat kilt next year, so I will have plenty of left-over material from cut pleats with which to remake buckle tabs (the Glenisla has leather tabs).

    But Since this is only a low yardage kilt with very shallow pleats (less than 3 yards in the pleats), is it necessary to cut these pleats first, or could I just stitch the stabiliser on, steek, then stitch canvas down without cutting then apply lining?


  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Michael A For This Useful Post:

    tpa

  3. #2
    Join Date
    13th January 14
    Location
    Wisconsin, US
    Posts
    806
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am very curious to hear what people have to say. From what I have seen of all the different 5-yarders being made out there, none that have seen are cut, nor do any have stabilizer and serious internals. I have been told that this is due to the yardage. Without the cut-away in the pleats and with the lower yardage, the needs of stabilizers, etc. are not there.
    Vestis virum reddit

  4. The Following User Says 'Aye' to IsaacW For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    7th September 14
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    890
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am also curious what the kilt makers have to offer....

    Maybe the construction allows the wool to be more stable, but it makes sense to add the usual innards to the 5yd for the sake of longevity. Especially if the kilt is intended to be worn often. I wouldn't think the 5yd pleats not be cut, and perhaps can't anyway due to the stitching/construction. Some canvas shouldn't add bulk at all.

    .... (sits and waits to read from those who know)

  6. #4
    Join Date
    4th November 16
    Location
    South Jersey, US
    Posts
    101
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Taskr View Post
    I am also curious what the kilt makers have to offer....
    I'm frankly surprised none of them ever responded to this. But from what I've read on this forum, essentially it's the stabilizer that's strapped to your body and the wool just sort of floats over it. So yes, if you want the kilt to last, you can't rely on the wool to take the stress of the straps. I gave my simple 4- and 5-yard RevK kilts a polyester lining inside the 2.5" wide waistband (to which the two primary straps and buckles are attached) to help prevent it from stretching. Not a traditional stabilizer by any means, but I knew if I relied completely on the wool, it would gradually distort from the strain. Whereas I wore each those three kilts two or three times a week for six months, and have so far not seen any indication that they're losing their structural integrity.

  7. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Dollander For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    8th August 07
    Location
    Westchester/Putnam NY
    Posts
    441
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I make 5 yard kilts, I don't do pleat cut-outs and I don't make a straphole.

    I do the inner construction the way I do on 4 /5 yard box pleated kilts..... waist stabilizer, steeking and
    3" wide canvas. I do canvas on the aprons, and lining for the aprons and back. I sew a buckle tab on the right hand side to go with the apron strap.

    Next I sew the other buckle tab 1" in from the far edge of the under-apron.
    Then I sew an inner strap as done for box-pleated kilts.
    Bonnie Heather Greene, Kiltmaker and Artist
    Traditional hand stitched kilts, kilt alterations, kilt-skirts

  9. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to bonnie heather For This Useful Post:


  10. #6
    Join Date
    9th August 16
    Location
    Camden, New South Wales
    Posts
    143
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Bonnie.

    Since this was made with a strap hole rather than a hidden strap/buckle, I will preserve the one that is there. But in all other respects I shall follow your tips.

    Thanks again,

    Michael

  11. #7
    Join Date
    25th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
    Posts
    4,908
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The purpose of the stabilizer is to take the horizontal stress of strapping the kilt on. If, when you pull on the buckles you see the kilt stretching and the stress transferred to the fabric or the stitching - Then you need the stabilizer.

    If you pull on the straps and see the apron fabric stretching and distorting you need the stabilizer.

    The purpose of interfacing is to give vertical stiffness and shape to the kilt. If you can stand the Fell of the kilt up, and it stands on its own, you do not need interfacing. If the Fell does not stand up, then the kilt will hang better with the addition of interfacing.

    If when wearing the kilt you see puckering of the aprons then the kilt will hang better with the addition of interfacing.

    Together the stabilizer and interfacing allow the outer fabric to drape naturally and swish properly.

    The reason for cutting away the fabric behind the Fell is to thin the back of the kilt. If not thinned the back may be overly thick causing sweating and the dread "pillow butt". If the back is already thin enough, due to less fabric as in a box pleated kilt, thinning may not be required.

    The reason the internal elements are left out of a low yardage kilt is simply that these kilts are made and sold to be as low in cost as possible. The way the cost is kept low is not just because less fabric need be bought, but leaving out the internal elements saves material and labor costs.

    I have always found it odd. Those kilts that do not have the cut-away pleats and the internal elements will still have a liner installed. The only purpose for the liner is to hide all that 'stuff" inside a well made kilt. It is almost like the liner is put in simply to deceive those who do now know how a well made kilt is constructed. (I heard one maker of these kilts explain that the liner was there to keep the kilt clean. To which I could only reply -"Well, if that were true, then the liner would be removable and washable?")
    Last edited by Steve Ashton; 7th August 17 at 12:51 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  12. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0