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  1. #91
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    The original meaning of what I had said is that I see few places where a dirk would be fitting or helpful. I did not mean for this thread to get off track by mentioning a situation where something like a dirk would be a helpful tool to have.

    I understand how what I said was misunderstood as I did not go in depth.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by LKM View Post
    The original meaning of what I had said is that I see few places where a dirk would be fitting or helpful. I did not mean for this thread to get off track by mentioning a situation where something like a dirk would be a helpful tool to have.

    I understand how what I said was misunderstood as I did not go in depth.
    Yes, this thread has gone off track and has become much ado about nothing, regarding the carrying of knives. It is not unusual at Highland Games to see lots of dirks and other historic knives, as well as swords, Lochaber axes, Viking axes, etc. Unless there are local or State laws prohibiting open carry of these blades, nothing happens - or if some wise guy decides to brandish them or threaten someone with their blade which, after attending hundreds of games, I do not recall ever seeing.

    The long and the short of it is, don't bring your blades if it is prohibited by law or by the event or by the church. Otherwise, just use good judgment. As I posted earlier, I wear a dirk with day wear, at the games. I like blades, used to be a dealer and they are conversation pieces. Just do not get carried away.

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  4. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Searl View Post
    I'm a Canadian and I have been a member of this site for a couple of years now. Something that has always made me wonder why is, why is it so important to Americans to be armed...
    It might be veering dangerously offtopic to comment on this (and yes my post will soon get onto the dirk thing) but as an American this intrigues me just as much as it does you.

    I'm from West Virginia and the situation there is much like the situation Jock Scot describes in Britain: people who do sport hunting have the guns you use for that. The difference is that Jock Scot says a small percentage of the British population does sport hunting, while a large percentage of West Virginians do sport hunting, in particular deer hunting.

    It goes to figure: West Virginia is vast tracts of dense forest teeming with millions of deer, and very few people! So you have your deer rifle and you go hunting in deer season. Seems like everyone has a deer rifle in their house. But your deer rifle is like your saw or hammer or drill- it's a tool for a specific function. It's not a collectable, it's not a doo-dad.

    The stuff I hear all the time about "gun nuts" and people romanticizing guns etc comes from the imagination of outsiders and is foreign to my people. There are still many Appalachians who live off the land (they are Hunter-Gatherers, in truth) and to them hunting is survival.

    This all being the case, I don't wear a dirk when I'm piping because there's no purpose for it.

    As for why so many Americans, when they dress up in Scottish attire, wear historical or quasi-historical things like rough knit bonnets, Jacobite/pirate shirts, 18th century weaponry, leather bag-like sporrans, moccasins, and so forth, I can only guess that they link Scottishness with the time period in which most of our Scots arrived.
    Last edited by OC Richard; Today at 05:33 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

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  6. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlisle401 View Post

    The wearing of a dirk is fine (and) appropriate for a military piper, not for anyone else.
    It's part of the uniform of not only pipers but also officers and certain others, in the former Highland regiments and now the Royal Regiment Of Scotland.

    Generally pipers wear the so-called "pipers' dirk" that lacks the knife & fork, while the Pipe Major, Drum Major, and Officers wear full dirks that include the knife and fork.

    This photo shows three grades of dirk being worn in the same military pipe band, quite interesting



    But your point is well taken, the dirk has been an unusual thing in civilian Highland Dress for over a century now.
    Last edited by OC Richard; Today at 05:47 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

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