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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    I really like that example! It's interesting that they call it "undress". I assume the term "daywear" or "casual" weren't in the common lexicon at the time. This was an interesting transition period where, apparently, patterned hose were still de rigueur for all levels of Highland dress along with spats, even for a tweed shooting outfit. But as you said, the daywear sporran had transitioned away from hair sporrans to a simpler style (I notice it is still on a chain rather than a leather strap). Am I correct in saying that this transition period was from about 1900 to 1912-ish? As I recall, we don't see spats and patterned hose for daywear after WWI.

    The tweed jacket piqued my interest. I like the simple cuff style, but it was the tweed pattern that caught my eye. It bears a very striking resemblance to my vintage Lanacburn tweed jacket (though the construction details are a bit different). It's a very bold pattern by today's standards, but it looks great in that catalog example. I wish we would see more of these "loud" tweed patterns in modern kilt jackets. It's a classic look.

    I also like the cut of the waistcoat he's wearing. The high closure and fairly flat bottom work very well.

    Itís an uncanny resemblance down to the sporran. Are you sure you didnít rob the poor manís wardrobe? ;)

    You could have at least taken the shotgun as well.
    Descendant of the Gillises and MacDonalds of North Morar.

  2. #32
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    13th March 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guthrumironhead View Post
    It almost mimics late 18th century military dress, taking artistic license into account of course.
    Attachment 35240
    I can see that. A person has to wonder why though.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by FossilHunter View Post
    It’s an uncanny resemblance down to the sporran. Are you sure you didn’t rob the poor man’s wardrobe? ;)

    You could have at least taken the shotgun as well.
    It's funny; I had never seen that image until it was posted today. The similarity to my jacket and sporran were enough of a coincidence, but having a photo from several years ago where I was in a similar pose that could be cropped down for a side-by-side comparison was icing on the cake.

    I do have a 1902 model Damascus barrel break-open shotgun (single barrel, though, not double), Argyle hose that match my Ancient Colquhoun kilt, and grey spats. I could trim my beard to a little point at the chin and wax my mustache out like his. It wouldn't be a perfect match on every nit-picky detail, but I could reenact this painting pretty closely, cigarette and all. Close enough for a couple of chuckles, anyway. I may just have to do that!
    Last edited by Tobus; 2nd October 18 at 10:29 AM.

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  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guthrumironhead View Post
    It almost mimics late 18th century military dress, taking artistic license into account of course.
    Attachment 35240
    Mid late as by the late the coatee style had come in amongst British troops.

    Also the style depicted closed using hooks and eyes rather than buttons. Although I understand the lapels could be buttuned across at the mid point if required.
    Last edited by Allan Thomson; 2nd October 18 at 01:59 PM.

  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post



    Here is a virtually identical jacket and vest (vest, not waistcoat!) down to the cuff style.

    That is unexpected!

  7. #36
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    great info

    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    A thread on the topic of Sheriffmuir jackets got me looking through my collection of vintage Highland Dress catalogues.

    A rough timeline emerged, which might be of interest.

    There is a pattern of new styles first being thought of as being for youths and/or young men, and later becoming accepted for gentlemen's attire.

    The background is that in the 19th century men's Highland Dress was almost infinitely variable and the categories "day" and "evening" dress not having absolute demarcation.

    By far the most popular jacket from c1850 until the early years of the 20th century was the Doublet. It usually had the same collar and lapels as ordinary jackets of the time, the distinctive feature being the "Inverness" skirts around the bottom.

    Highland Evening Dress became much more simple, sleek, and uniform in the early years of the 20th century, with new styles emerging and only the Doublet (now often called the Standard Doublet to differentiate it from the various new doublets) a holdover from the 19th century.

    The first new style to emerge was the Coatee or Prince Charlie Coatee, of which was written in 1914:

    "In place of the doublet some Scottish dresses have a coatee, or short coat, with abbreviated tails, like a morning coat. It is quite optional whether this is worn, or the doublet. Any form of the Coatee, however, is entirely modern..."

    A glance through eight vintage Highland Dress catalogues shows the following. First the firm, then the date as best as it can be inferred, then the styles shown and/or listed in the same order as the catalogue, along with any comments appearing in the catalogue:

    R G Lawrie c1926
    1) "doublet"
    2) "coatee"

    Fraser Ross c1930
    1) "Prince Charlie coatee"
    2) "Doublet"
    3) "Dress Argyle" (sic)
    4) "Montrose" "A favourite style for youths, men also show a preference for its smart appearance."

    Paisleys pre-1936
    1) "Montrose" "suitable for 7 to 17 years."
    2) "Strathmore" (standard Doublet) "for men, and young men from 16 years."
    3) "Prince Charlie Coatee" "for gentlemen."

    Anderson 1936
    1) "the Coatee" "specially suited for a young man or an older man of slim figure. It is definitely less suitable for the stouter figure."
    2) "the Doublet" "Is less popular than it once was, but it is particularly suitable for older men."
    3) "the Kenmore Doublet" "A style of coat we designed." (It's nice, and rare, to have such a clear origin for a Highland jacket style.)

    Rowans 1938
    1) black Argyll "boys 5 to 15"
    2) "coat" (a single-breasted Montrose) "boys of all ages over 6 years"
    3) "regulation doublet" "most popular"
    4) "coatee" "favourite with the younger set"
    5) "coat" (a single-breasted Montrose, this time shown on an adult man) "increasingly popular in recent years"

    Paisleys 1939
    1) "Prince Charlie Coatee" "correct dress for gentlemen's evening wear."
    2) "Montrose" "suitable 7 to 17 years"
    3) "Deeside Evening Outfit" "for men, and young men from 16 years." (this was called "Strathmore" in their earlier catalogue, the Standard Doublet by another name.)

    Anderson post-1953
    1) "the coatee" "most popular"
    2) "standard doublet" "suits the older man"
    3) "Kenmore Doublet" "another favoured style" "good lines without unnecessary embellishment."
    4) (not pictured) "Rannoch Doublet" "a smart double-breasted design"
    5) (not pictured) "Appin Jacket" "a neat, short coat usually worn belted."

    Forsyth 1950s
    1) "standard doublet"
    2) "Morar doublet" (a jacket identical to the Kenmore is illustrated)
    3) "Montrose doublet" (shown both single-breasted and double-breasted)

    As you can see the Sheriffmuir does not appear.
    This was most helpful and well researched. I had been discussing this very topic with a friend earlier today. Thanks for this post.

  8. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnE View Post
    I can see that. A person has to wonder why though.
    Because military fashions and civilian fashions interlink. The cut away coat style was worn by civilians too - just in a more civilian style...

  9. #38
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    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guthrumironhead View Post
    It almost mimics late 18th century military dress...
    Attachment 35240
    Yes similar in the upper part of the opening came together and the lower part hung open, but different in construction and profile.

    The 18th coat had lapels which were buttoned back. Earlier on the two sides hung down more or less straight down, but as the century progressed it became fashionable for the lower portion to hang open. The front edges of the jacket formed curves )( coming closest together around the heart.

    A late 18th century military coat with lapels so strongly curved that it almost certainly couldn't be buttoned up.



    This degenerated into uniform tunics like this, with false lapels of impossible shape



    A late 18th century civilian coat, with functional buttons, though due to the cut it probably couldn't be buttoned all the way down, but was designed to hang open




    The mid-19th century jacket was buttoned together near the top, hanging open in fairly straight lines /\

    What's interesting about Highland jackets is that you see various types being worn side-by-side at the same period, ones with steeply angled fronts only possible to button at the top and ones more or less straight-sided with functional buttons, which could be buttoned shut all the way down.

    Here's ones you can button all the way up







    And here are angled-open fronts





    Last edited by OC Richard; 5th October 18 at 07:27 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  11. #39
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    Richard-

    Are you familiar with the Internet Archive ó http://www.archive.org ?
    i would think they would be interested in your collection of photos and catalogs. It would be great to have them all in one place?

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