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Thread: Kilt pin advice

  1. #11
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    I think Richard's reasons are viable (except #3, which I can not confirm or deny) for not having a kilt pin. I believe there are reasons for kilt pins that are plausible for the owner's modesty and for wearing fine pieces of jewelry.

    That could be a discussion for another day.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    I think Richard's reasons are viable (except #3, which I can not confirm or deny) for not having a kilt pin. I believe there are reasons for kilt pins that are plausible for the owner's modesty and for wearing fine pieces of jewelry.

    That could be a discussion for another day.
    Number three is paraphrasing “So You’re Going to Wear the Kilt”. It and every other source I’ve read insist that the pin when worn should hang from the left apron only, rather than pinning the left apron to the right. The explanation is that it will spoil the hang of the aprons to pin them together—it absolutely does!

    If one takes this advice, though, and wears the pin on the left apron as an ornament only, then it is not serving its intended modesty enhancing purpose.

  3. #13
    Terry Searl is offline This person has chosen not to remain within the community
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    undergarment

    To me all this talk of modesty is silly and I would think only applies if the kilt wearer is not wearing an undergarment ........wear an undergarment and your concerns are solved .........as has been stated here many times before, an undergarment also helps with keeping the inside of the kilt clean.
    The need for a kilt pin becomes purely decorative and as such is easily made redundant......take a lesson from ladies and especially young ladies, for years they've worn skirts much shorter than any kilt and they have little to no concerns about modesty or so it seems.........just my tuppence worth
    Last edited by Terry Searl; 15th March 18 at 11:28 PM.

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardtheLarge View Post
    Several reasons:

    1. They create more or less permanent holes in the most presentational section of the kilt—the apron!
    2. If they’re caught on an object, they likewise risk tearing the apron.
    3. They are an English invention born out of the judgment that kilts are intrinsically indecent/provocative, and that measures must be taken to keep the aprons together.
    4. They no longer serve even their intended purpose, as nowadays everyone is pinning the left apron to nothing.
    5. They pull focus down and to the left from the perspective of the observer, disrupting the balance and symmetry of the figure and depleting visual interest in the sporran and kilt.

    Other than that, they’re great!
    To me, #3 is waving the flag for Victorian Era. All others make sense. Being an ex-parts peddler, I see the nasty side of kilt pins (in current times). Another thing to make a buck, quid, shekel, et cetera. Looking at old photos, as in.....
    http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/f...ription-93753/
    ...no pins. The sporran seems to keep the apron in check. Being unlearned, no comments please, "When did the kilt pin begin use?" Not hijacking the thread, any information should be considered an addition to advice. Knowledge may, or may not, help make a choice.
    "I can draw a mouse with a pencil, but I can't draw a pencil with a mouse"

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Searl View Post
    I think it is pretty enough depending on how large they are. I think you have to be careful about the weight of a kilt pin as they may stress the weave of the material of the kilt......just my thoughts
    DSCN0245.jpg

    I tend to wear larger kilt pins, measuring about 2 1/2" across, but I wear them higher than most people, about 8" from the lower selveged edge of the outer apron. Rounded pins are my preference (as opposed to miniature claymores or bits of stag horn), so that they are less likely to snag. This works very well with 16 0z. wool, and does not stress the fabric. I don't think I would try it on a lighter weight kilt, though. The larger pins have sufficient weight, and of course they are pinned through only the outer apron.

    One thing that I find helps keep the pins from pulling on the fabric, and also keeps them from falling off in the unlikely event that the pin should disengage, is to push a piece of elastic band over the pin and snug it up against the fabric. Do the same at the pointy end of the pin. Works a treat.
    EPITAPH: Decades from now, no one will know what my bank balance looked like, it won't matter to anyone what kind of car I drove, nor will anyone care what sort of house I lived in. But the world will be a different place, because I did something so mind bafflingly eccentric that my ruins have become a tourist attraction.

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  8. #16
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    I'm not a fan of kilt pins either.

    It's mainly from the practical considerations the other Richard brought up.

    Being in the pipe band world since the 1970s, there have been several times when I've looked through pile of old band kilts. It's night and day, the kilts from a band that wears kilt pins, and the one that doesn't. The front aprons of the non-pin-wearing band's kilts will be in good condition, few if any holes.

    On the other hand, nearly every front apron on the pin-wearing band's kilts will have holes, some small, some you can put a finger through. Some kilts will have rips rather than holes, rips a few inches long in some cases. Why? Well your band is playing in a crowded pub or restaurant, and you're marching through, squeezing between tables and people, and both your hands are on your chanter, and your kilt is constantly brushing past things, and many of these things are catching and tugging on the pin. The big tears and rips are usually on the drummer's kilts. Drums are heavy and have metal bits sticking out. Whenever the drummers unhook their drums to put them down one of those bits can catch on the kilt pin and kilt fabric isn't going to stand up to being pulled apart by a 15 pound drum going to the ground.

    Also kilt pins are unnecessary do-dads. They serve no function. I don't stick pins on my pants, on my shirts, on my jackets. So why stick one on my kilt?

    Then there are the historical considerations, if you care about that. Kilt pins seem to not appear until around the middle of the 19th century, and were a bit uncommon until the 20th. They have never been essential (unless you're in the Gordon Highlanders).

    Outdoor Highland Dress in the 1860s. The only metal bit is the watch chain. No cap badge, no kilt pin, no badge on the sporran, no sgian, the sporran on a plain leather belt. And also no flashes, which nowadays many consider necessary.



    Last edited by OC Richard; 16th March 18 at 06:44 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

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