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View Poll Results: Irish flat cap with Scottish Kilt

Voters
56. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, mix it up

    23 41.07%
  • No,

    23 41.07%
  • Yes, with Clan Badge/Kilt Pin on Cap

    0 0%
  • Yes, without Clan Badge/Kilt Pin on cap

    10 17.86%
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Results 51 to 54 of 54
  1. #51
    Join Date
    19th January 15
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    New York
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jock Scot View Post
    That's odd, I could swear I've seen a picture of you, Jock, in a flat cap leaning on a crook. Maybe you were not wearing a kilt, I cannot remember, but if not why was the picture there unless it was crook related?
    Oh there must be hundreds of pictures of me wearing a tweed cap, but there will be not one of me wearing a tweed cap whilst wearing the kilt.

    An example.

    A better view of the cromach.

    This might be the picture you are thinking of?

    I do however, wear a fore and aft with the kilt on occasion.
    [/QUOTE]
    That is a jolly nice suit.


    SaveSave

  2. #52
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
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    Quote Originally Posted by tokareva View Post
    Dollander, the Caubeen looks great, but I think I like the Papakha more.

    Attachment 33514
    I don't know if the Papakha is a piper's hat, but this is, the standard hat of the Bulgarian piper

    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

  3. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  4. #53
    Join Date
    8th February 18
    Location
    Near the Summit, above Silicon Valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by tokareva View Post

    If nothing else, a piper in a Papakha is an impressive sight. As one with the beginnings of a hat collection, the Papakha, is now on the must acquire list. Dollander, my thanks for posting the photo!
    "I can draw a mouse with a pencil, but I can't draw a pencil with a mouse"

  5. #54
    Join Date
    4th November 16
    Location
    South Jersey, US
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    As someone who plays the Highland pipes, uilleann pipes, and Scottish smallpipes, I find that each instrument has its own place.

    I only had two St Patrick's Day gigs but at both of them I played all three pipes, plus whistles. 18th and early 19th century mentions of piping concerts show that at that time it was commonplace for professional pipers to perform on the Great Highland pipes, Union pipes (what we now call uilleann pipes), and the German flute (what we now call the Irish flute) at the same event.

    The music of the TV show Outlander is historically accurate in featuring the Great Highland pipes, the Union/uilleann pipes, and Scottish smallpipes on the soundtrack.

    BTW there's nothing specifically Irish about the Union/uilleann pipes. In the 18th century the centres of Union/uilleann pipemaking and playing were Edinburgh, Aberdeen, North Shields, and London, with Dublin bringing up the rear.

    The great advantage of the uilleann pipes is the ability to correctly play not only many Tin Pan Alley Irish favourites like Danny Boy and Irish Eyes Are Smiling but also many Robert Burns songs, Scottish folk songs, and Hymns not correctly performable on the Highland pipes.

    The Great Highland pipes are unbeatable in several respects: their volume (you never need a PA system) the mobility they give the performer and the iconic look of a piper in full garb.

    You march into a room playing the Highland pipes and everyone says "Here's the piper!"

    You sit in a corner playing the uilleann pipes and everyone says "what is that thing?"
    Well, I learned something. I guess I always assumed the uillean pipes were Irish due to their modern association with Irish folk music. It doesn't make me any less irked when movies dub them over an actor clearly playing the Highland pipes, though.

    As for the authenticity of the Outlander soundtrack, I figure such a singular composer as Bear McCreary can use whatever instruments he wants as long as they fit the mood of the scene.

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