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  1. #101
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    Thanks for that interesting link, Tobus. Obviously, like everything else, these shoes have evolved over time to their present form. I have encountered other comments where discussion over such inoffensive items as shoes, socks, even shirts etc. seems to trigger the most intemperate of reactions. Perhaps this is symptomatic of internet fora where people, hiding behind a keyboard will say things they would not dream of to someone beside them in a bus queue. Enough said I think.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivor View Post
    Thanks for explaining that, Allan so these buckle shoes are really something re-enactors are likely to wear are they? I just thought they looked quite distinctive but not if people would think they are women's shoes! I take it nobody really wears them anyway (apart from McMurdo that is).
    I wear them. I do find it curious that wearing the kilt itself with all of the mistaken “skirt” associations is no problem, but a buckle brogue (a dress military style) crosses this line.

  3. #103
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    You make a very valid point, Richard, and perhaps highlights a masculine insecurity towards their clothing which, seemingly, must be strictly circumscribed.
    Perhaps because kilts are widely recognised as an acceptable form of male clothing this counteracts any such ambivalent attitudes but it is obvious that this does not extend to all forms of highland dress.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivor View Post
    You make a very valid point, Richard, and perhaps highlights a masculine insecurity towards their clothing which, seemingly, must be strictly circumscribed.
    Perhaps because kilts are widely recognised as an acceptable form of male clothing this counteracts any such ambivalent attitudes but it is obvious that this does not extend to all forms of highland dress.
    Frankly, I might even dispute the point that kilts are “widely accepted” as menswear, even in the States. My own feedback is mixed. Some members of the forum have reported negative reactions within Scotland’s own borders!

    When we analyze kiltwear as a whole, there are in fact several articles which might be considered feminine to the wider and uninformed audience: knee high socks with a tartan skirt often has a school uniform association, and nothing whatsoever to do with men outside of those in the know, whether or not they have any Celtic or Gaelic or Pictish heritage. There is also the “Scots’ purse” (sporran) to consider. In some cultures and at various periods of history men wore purses to carry their personal goods and objects. Today the very word “purse” associated with men can provoke a negative reaction.

    I find psychological and sociological issues of gender insofar as kiltwear goes to be a varied and infinitely interesting subject. But these issues really do perplex me. How does your tartan skirt (kilt, I know, I know) with knee socks (kilt hose, I know, I know) pass the test of girlishness while the military’s smart buckle brogue succumbs? Baffling.
    Last edited by RichardtheLarge; 4th September 18 at 02:27 PM.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    I don't know if you've seen it, but OC Richard posted a nicely detailed thread about this curious trend of buckles moving down towards the toe over time, and the transition to the "Mary Jane" style that seems prevalent today. It's an interesting read with some good follow-up discussion.

    Incidentally, I've noticed over time that OC Richard has amassed quite a treasure trove of historical photos and knowledge of Highland dress, ranging from pipe bands and military uniforms to civilian dress items. Based on his attention to detail and his willingness to freely share this information in the way that he does, I think he deserves "forum historian" status as some others have been granted. How do we nominate him for that?

    http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/f103/buckled-shoe-styles-94062/
    I agree; OC Richard is extremely suited to a historian position.

    At a guess, it seems that the shoe buckle got lower and lower to show off more and more of the hose, until finally, the shoe was cut so low that it became rather unstable on the foot. The ankle strap, then, mitigated that.
    Last edited by RichardtheLarge; 4th September 18 at 03:02 PM.

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