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  1. #11
    Join Date
    27th October 09
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    OC Richard, I do have a question on piper uniforms. I ran across this WWII photo the other day, and all I remember of the description was that it was somewhere in Italy.

    I'm assuming you can identify who these pipers belong to by their kilts and other uniform details?

    They seem to have some differences between them (mainly their hose, dirks, and belts), though I don't know if this means they are from different regiments. I don't see hackles in their Glengarries and I don't know much of what to look for. These appear to be field-level dress, and I didn't realise that they still included fancy dirks and Argyle hose with that level of dress. Can you provide more info not only on their regiment but the level of dress uniform they are wearing?

    Last edited by Tobus; 21st August 18 at 08:14 AM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post

    I'm assuming you can identify who these pipers belong to by their kilts and other uniform details?

    They seem to have some differences between them (mainly their hose, dirks, and belts), though I don't know if this means they are from different regiments. I don't see hackles in their Glengarries and I don't know much of what to look for. These appear to be field-level dress, and I didn't realise that they still included fancy dirks and Argyle hose with that level of dress.
    It's a famous photo and I have it in a book somewhere with a caption that gives date and location, in Sicily possibly.

    The red Erskine tartan kilt worn by the Pipe Major on the left identifies The Royal Scots Fusiliers. The belled flashes on the piper on the right identifies The Gordon Highlanders.

    About feathers or hackles in pipers' Glengarries, that would only be seen in Full Dress and perhaps No2 Dress.

    About tartan or diced hose-tops, that varied by regiment.

    About the wearing of dirks while on campaign, with otherwise plain uniforms, you see that sometimes, by pipers.

    Here in WWI



    Here in 1938- with shorts!



    Here in post-WWII Palestine are dirks and the ornate piper's dirk belts and crossbelts being worn in shirtsleeve order, with puttees rather than spats.

    Last edited by OC Richard; 21st August 18 at 06:11 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  4. #13
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    I just came across this great photo showing the differences in kit between a piper and the Pipe Major of 3SCOTS The Black Watch:



    Bonnet badge: RRS cap badge, Sphinx badge.

    Crossbelt: traditional Black Watch pattern, civilian thistle #109 pattern.

    Upper crossbelt badge: single-metal, bi-metal.

    Doublet: standard RRS OR's No1 Dress, Pipe Major/Drum Major with full gold lace.

    Dirk: standard piper's dirk, traditional Black Watch officer's dirk.

    Kilt: plain, with Sergeant/Officer ribbons.

    Bag-cover: tartan, velvet.

    Then there are the specific badges of office and rank: the Pipe Major's four chevrons and wreathed pipes badges, and crimson sash.
    Last edited by OC Richard; 10th November 18 at 07:01 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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