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  1. #31
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    The rule of thumb (BTW does anyone remember their history classes and remember where that phrase comes from?) when ironing or pressing is -

    To use the temperature setting that is the lowest. So in the case of a Polyester and Wool blend use the Polyester setting on your iron. (about 300 F or 148C) or about the same as you would for Wool.

    The Wool in the blend will do best with steam but the steam will have little effect on the Polyester.

    I would press a poly/wool bend and not iron. I would use a dampened pressing cloth. And I would use lots of steam.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  2. #32
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    About the question in my above post.

    Rule of Thumb - At one time it was an English law that allowed a husband to beat his wife as long as the stick he used was no larger than his thumb.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    The rule of thumb (BTW does anyone remember their history classes and remember where that phrase comes from?) when ironing or pressing is -

    To use the temperature setting that is the lowest. So in the case of a Polyester and Wool blend use the Polyester setting on your iron. (about 300 F or 148C) or about the same as you would for Wool.

    The Wool in the blend will do best with steam but the steam will have little effect on the Polyester.

    I would press a poly/wool bend and not iron. I would use a dampened pressing cloth. And I would use lots of steam.
    Thank you, Sir! Information noted, & a copy stored with the kilt accessories.

    Attempting to lighten up, a lousy day for "She....", I passed on the information regarding the Rule of Thumb. After 7.25 hours, she was attempting to take lunch (which lasted 8 minutes), & called me (tell you how bad her life is?). For fun, I explained the 'Rule', she rapidly replied with there was no restriction in law dictating what a wife may use on her husband. Followed with, do you want to learn where "Old Bat" came from? At the least, the eight minute break ended with laughter. Now, to go find the bloody thing & hide it, where she cant find it!
    "I can draw a mouse with a pencil, but I can't draw a pencil with a mouse"

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  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    When caring for items made from acrylic fibers - Please, please remember that these are a special and unique types of fabrics.

    You do not press acrylic. You iron with a very light pressure. You keep the iron moving at all times.

    You use the very lowest setting on your iron. No more than 275 F.

    You do not use steam.

    Caution is a must as the result of too high a temp or keeping the hot sole plate in one place too long will be a molten blob of plastic.
    Oh. No steam? Dry press cloth, then, for a non-steaming iron?

    (In my case, it's a some-sort-of-synthetic-no-idea-what-type pleated skirt I'm going to be pressing, not my kilt, but everything else I've read said use a damp press cloth?)
    Here's tae us - / Wha's like us - / Damn few - / And they're a' deid - /
    Mair's the pity!

  6. #35
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    You are correct. The words in my post may be read in a misleading way. I am sorry.

    I guess I should have worded it more like "Steam has less effect on synthetics than it does on wool so steam is used in a different way, or for a different reason, than it is used on wool."

    Because wool fibers are softened by the steam we can use the steam as an additional tool.
    But synthetics are softened by steam less than wool.

    We still use a damp pressing cloth - but with wool, the damp pressing cloth serves three purposes. Protect the fabric from the hard metal sole plate - create steam as the primary, controlled, heat source - and soften the fibers.

    On synthetics the damp pressing cloth is used to protect the fabric from the hard metal sole plate - and to protect the fabric from excess heat.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    On synthetics the damp pressing cloth is used to protect the fabric from the hard metal sole plate - and to protect the fabric from excess heat.
    Okay, thanks. That was what I originally thought would be the case, but I want to make sure to do it right! (Foolishly put skirt in dryer, narrow box pleats no longer as crisp as they were, came here to see if there were instructions on basting box pleats. Skirt is cheap but non-replaceable-- not bought in U.S. and I am now stuck in U.S.-- and I really like it, so am hoping to salvage the pleats. But I am an ironing novice... haven't ever even been brave enough to have a go at basting my kilt...)
    Here's tae us - / Wha's like us - / Damn few - / And they're a' deid - /
    Mair's the pity!

  8. #37
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    If you have an industral steam iron (or what are sometimes called 'pressing systems') you do not even need to touch the fabric with the iron soleplate. So would not need a pressing cloth.

    Shoot jets of steam into the fabric to heat it and then use a wooden "clapper" (that will not leave a shiney spot), to press down, setting the creases.

    Steam is a marvolous thing. It is almost a lost art and one of a kiltmakers most important tools.

    Fabric, and especially wool, can be molded and shaped into almost unimaginable three dimensionable shapes with steam. And steam is a very controlled and predictable temperature so is far safer around fabrics than a hot iron soleplate.

    Here is Barb T. using an industral steamer and clapper to set the pleat creases.

    Last edited by The Wizard of BC; 18th November 18 at 01:30 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  9. The Following User Says 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


  10. #38
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    Here is the bottom edge showing the form of box pleats.



    The purpose of basting is to temporarly hold the pleats while you press. Sort of like pinning without leaving the bumps pins leave.

    There is no one 'correct' or 'proper' way to baste. Just as long as the pleats will not move around under your pressing cloth.

    But please remember that a kilt or skirt, where the upper portion of the pleats are tapered, will no longer lay totally flat.

    You must lift the upper, tapered area, and allow the pleated area to lay flat, with the pleats straight and parallel.

    Last edited by The Wizard of BC; 18th November 18 at 01:49 AM.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  11. The Following User Says 'Aye' to The Wizard of BC For This Useful Post:


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