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  1. #1
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    HOW TO IRON A KILT SUCESSFULLY...Little work, but it is worth it..

    Read the WHOLE thing before you start......Make sure you DO NOT IRON DIRECTY ON THE WOOL..... I posted on another post on my Grandfather Ironing his kilt before the games every year. I called my cousin who he stayed with and she described the whole ritual, I searched on line and found this.......

    Getting Started: Tips for Ironing Kilt Pleats with Ease

    Itís easiest to iron pleats using an ironing board where you can systematically move the garment full circle as you iron until you get back to where you started from. Slip the pleated kilt over the end of the board, with the board inside the garment, and let it lie as flat and smooth as possible. Check your garmentís care label and set the iron to the appropriate temperature for the fabric.



    Pin Your Pleats Before You Iron Them

    The bad news is that youíre going to have to do this one pleat at a time for the best results. But it will be worth it, I promise.

    Holding the waistband or top of the garment firmly, pull the bottom of the first pleat until it is straight. Smooth it down then hold it in place with paperclips, a hair slide or bobby pins. Metal pins are also ok to use if the fabric isnít too delicate but avoid anything plastic or plastic coated as it could melt. And be careful not to iron over whatever youíre using to hold the pleat in place so you donít damage it or your clothes. Repeat until you have enough pleats in place to be just wider than the iron (probably about three-five).

    This method is much better than using your hand to hold the pleats because it can be hard to keep them in place and also you run the risk of burning yourself.



    How to Iron Pleats

    Start at the top of the pleats and iron down towards the bottom, holding them down as you go (without getting the iron too close to your hand). Donít accidentally iron any of the pleats you arenít holding in place as you could either set them in an odd position or iron them out altogether. And resist the temptation to move the iron from side to side Ė that will move the pleats out of place.

    Keep turning the kilt, round on the ironing board, systematically adding more pleats Ė and securing them with clips or pins Ė as you go. Once you get the hang of it, the process does get quicker. You might even get into a bit of a rhythm. Eventually you WILL make it all the way back round to the first pleat.



    Donít Ruin All Your Hard Work

    After ironing, hang the kilt, from the top to keep the pleats hanging straight and if possible try to give pleated clothes a bit of extra space in the wardrobe. It would be a shame for all that hard work to go to waste. And donít forget to remove all the pins before you wear the kilt.

    VERY IMPORTANT A Few Extra Tips for Ironing Pleats

    Some materials (such as viscose and wool) can start to shine a bit when ironed, especially with pleated clothes where you are ironing three layers of cloth at a time. It can cause irregular marks where the cloth is folded underneath.

    To avoid this, try not to press too hard with the iron. You could also cover the area you are ironing with a thin damp cloth, or iron the garment inside out (though this is harder as you canít properly see what youíre doing). If only part of the garment is pleated, iron the flat areas first and the pleats last so that you donít mess the pleats up after youíve ironed them. Likewise, for a pleated kilt, skirt, iron the waistband before embarking on the pleats for the same reason.

    I know it sounds like a lot of work, but after youíve ironed a new garment once, it gets quicker every time.
    Allan Collin MacDonald III
    Grandfather - Clan Donald, MacDonald (Clanranald) /MacBride, Antigonish, NS, 1791
    Grandmother - Clan Chisholm of Strathglass, West River, Antigonish, 1803
    Scottish Roots: Knoidart, Inverness, Scotland, then to Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
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    I have have been told that you never iron a kilt as you would iron a shirt or trousers but press it.
    Shoot straight you bastards. Don't make a mess of it. Harry (Breaker) Harbord Morant - Bushveldt Carbineers

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  5. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Downunder Kilt View Post
    I have have been told that you never iron a kilt as you would iron a shirt or trousers but press it.
    Aye, I believe Steve Ashton dropped this knowledge-bomb on a discussion elsewhere online. Really opened my eyes to a number of important things, the two that stand out the most are, 1) as you said, press don't iron. 2) Use a pressing ham to press the area where the pleats are sewn together, right around the waist. That area was no end of trouble for me, and couldn't suss out why on my own.

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  7. #4
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    For wool:
    ALWAYS use a pressing cloth that has been thoroughly dampened with cold water (or a good boiler iron with teflon sole). Otherwise the wool will become shiny. I also think that it's a better idea to baste the kilt rather than using pins. Basting allows the cloth to truly lay flat whereas pins tend to cause distortion when being pressed.

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  9. #5
    Join Date
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    Posted this specifically in response to the original post. I do agree with the stiches rather pins, but pins are easy.
    Allan Collin MacDonald III
    Grandfather - Clan Donald, MacDonald (Clanranald) /MacBride, Antigonish, NS, 1791
    Grandmother - Clan Chisholm of Strathglass, West River, Antigonish, 1803
    Scottish Roots: Knoidart, Inverness, Scotland, then to Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.

  10. #6
    Join Date
    25th September 04
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    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    Perhaps this link to an earlier post will help.

    http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/s...ighlight=press

    I do not iron in the sense of moving the iron over the fabric. The iron is just the heat source to create the steam. The steam softens the fibers and is the pressed to take a sharp crease.

    I never us pins whe pressing. I baste. If there is one hint I give to kilt wearers, it is "learn to baste".

    I also take special care to lift the Fell area which allows the pleats to become straight and parallel.

    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

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