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  1. #31
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    Very nice tweed!

    Here's the KA page, over 140 tweeds, but no prices shown.

    https://www.kinlochanderson.com/tart...Heavy%20Weight,

    My favourites are 580 https://www.kinlochanderson.com/tart...ight/CL-KLK580

    and 370 https://www.kinlochanderson.com/tart...ight/CL-KLS370

    I don't know which weavers made these, I'm guessing their code letters relate to weavers.
    Last edited by OC Richard; 4th August 18 at 03:09 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  3. #32
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    22nd October 17
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    Richard,

    Those are both great patterns. I also really like 576, and 571 reminds me of the "Burns Check" jacket that McMurdo has. I fear that the lack of prices may indicate that "if you have to ask" it may be prohibitive to order the material for shipping to East Asia.

    Figheadair, The Johnstons site has some gorgeous patterns. And it is popping up with prices--in Chinese currency! But at 1400+RMB/meter (about $200/yard) and no idea of shipping costs, it may take me a while to save up for enough material to make a jacket/waistcoat combo.

    But it really gives you something to aspire to. Your outfit from Johnstons looks smashing.

    Andrew
    Last edited by kingandrew; 4th August 18 at 08:37 AM.

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingandrew View Post
    Figheadair, The Johnstons site has some gorgeous patterns. And it is popping up with prices--in Chinese currency! But at 1400+RMB/meter (about $200/yard) and no idea of shipping costs, it may take me a while to save up for enough material to make a jacket/waistcoat combo.

    But it really gives you something to aspire to. Your outfit from Johnstons looks smashing.

    Andrew
    Andrew,

    I have a Trade acct with Johnstons. PM me.

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  6. #34
    Join Date
    14th January 08
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    The 'classic' smell of older Harris tweed was due the use of Crotal as a dyestuff. It imparts a particular musky odour that is hard to beat. Unfortunately, it's hard, if not impossible, to find in modern tweed because the dyes are all artificial. Iím fortunate to have a jacket made from cloth dyed, spun and woven by the late Marion Campbell.
    Aye, Peter, I had several meters of 1950's vintage nut brown herringbone Harris tweed material wrapped in plastic for several years, awaiting my finding the right tailor to build me a nice Argyll jacket and waistcoat set. Each time I opened the drawer it was stored in I think I was getting that musty sweet "horse-sweat" smell that I now must presume was from the older dyes. Since moving to Texas I've little use for the tweeds I already own so a few months ago I sold the Harris tweed fabric for what was probably a song. I also had some lovely 18oz Black Watch tartan from the 1960's and a MOD tartan weaver whose name I have forgotten and who is long gone from the business. I now remember that that fabric had a lighter but similar scent, probably picked up from the tweed as they were stored together in the same drawer for several years. That tartan too is now gone, traded away, but for similar reasons of being too heavy for my current needs.

    I sure do miss that smell, though, each time I open that drawer now. It is barely there, probably only in my memory.

    Speaking of memory --- from my training in biology and medicine I remember that olfactory nerves (chemical sensitive neurons) and tactile neurons (temperature, pain and pressure sensitive neurons) are the most primitive types in the nervous system, being found in many of even the smallest multicell organisms, as they needed to be able to move toward chemical scents/tastes of potential nutrient sources, and move away from noxious substances and dangerous physical insults, purely from a survivalistic evolutionarily beneficial set of responses. Some of these functions are even present in single cell organisms today. These olfactory and physical sensory neural centers are housed in some of the developmentally "oldest" most primitive parts of our mammalian brains, albeit being less strong in humans than some other higher level mammals like canines and porcines and the like. Although we humans rely more on sight and sound for our daily survival than most lower mammals, those primitive smell centers in particular can be heartily aroused by some very simple but potent smells as you all have described, sometimes to the point of causing strong primitive systemic responses like flushing and sweating, desire and hunger, nausea, fear and revulsion. Fascinating what one can remember from more than 30 years ago, while at the same time not being able to remember what one ate for breakfast.

  7. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to ForresterModern For This Useful Post:


  8. #35
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jock Scot View Post
    Not in real life, but perhaps a dragon, with that wee tuft at the back of the head?
    As a matter of trivia, I might point out that early versions of the U.S. Marine Corps' "Eagle, Globe and Anchor" insignia featured a crested eagle - some think it was one of the species of crested sea eagles - from 1868-1955, when the American Bald Eagle was made the official bird on the emblem. So it appears that depictions of crested eagles were not that uncommon back in the day.

  9. #36
    Join Date
    6th July 07
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    The Highlands,Scotland.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orvis View Post
    As a matter of trivia, I might point out that early versions of the U.S. Marine Corps' "Eagle, Globe and Anchor" insignia featured a crested eagle - some think it was one of the species of crested sea eagles - from 1868-1955, when the American Bald Eagle was made the official bird on the emblem. So it appears that depictions of crested eagles were not that uncommon back in the day.
    A fair point, but have you ever seen a real, or depiction of, an eagle with a long neck?
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  10. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jock Scot View Post
    A fair point, but have you ever seen a real, or depiction of, an eagle with a long neck?
    Jock - I can't say that I have, so your point about the depicted creature being a swan or dragon (or any other long-necked beast) is a fair one, too. I was merely addressing the bit about the tuft on the back of the creature's head.

  11. #38
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Perhaps nothing to do with the sporrans in question, but this one is interesting

    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first white settlers on the Guyandotte

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