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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    I like a bit of shirt showing at the end of a jacket cuff. I have longer arms that need both the shirt and jacket to have a longer length. This would be easy if I could have all my clothes made. That is not the case. So, I alter (lately having that done for me) clothes after buying larger "off the rack" items. I swear by the work provided by the lady that alters my clothes.

    The best look will be the one that feels right as you wear the product. Also, welcome to the forum and hope you find the item that is perfect for you.
    Hi Tarheel, and thanks for your response.

    I agree that how the outfit feels on has a bearing on the overall look - nothing worse than it feeling strangely fitted, and then constantly adjusting things to make it feel better.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    I guess the thing we don't remind people about enough is that it is your jacket you are wearing. Not mine. There is no right or wrong.

    When you walk into a shop, and are willing to lay down your hard earned money, you should get exactly what you ask for.

    Take the advice of the shop clerk with a grain of salt. Their job is to make a sale.

    If you are not getting exactly the shirt and jacket you specify, be prepared to go to someone who will give you what your money is buying.

    And nothing less.

    If you buy Off-The-Rack or over the web, search out your local tailor. Every town of any size has one. Shortening a sleeve or lowering a collar are quick and inexpesive fixes to get a shirt or jacket that fits the way you want it to.
    Very good point regarding the shop clerk, Steve, which is the reason I thought I'd get some opinions here first, before going to the shops at the weekend. I anticipate that the clerks will give their advice, which might just be their personal opinion rather than from any actual proper sartorial knowledge, so it's great to have the advice of you guys who are actual wearers.

  4. #13
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    18th October 09
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    This is one of a number of things that, when I got into kiltwearing, struck me as being different in traditional Highland Dress and American suits.

    As a piper, even in civilian Highland Dress, there is some military influence, and oftentimes you see British military cuffs being worn rather longer than is seen in American civilian suits, down to halfway between the wrist and knuckles, sometimes down to the knuckles.



    I went back and looked over The Highlanders Of Scotland to see the mid-19th century Highland customs, and the sleeves are a bit on the long side, though some men are showing a sliver of shirt-cuff.

    Here in the US Southwest we pipers are often playing in hot weather, and wearing short-sleeved shirts is common.

    We have to wear jackets to look smart, but due to the heat I, for many years, have worn short-sleeved shirts with my Argyll jackets for piping gigs. Pipers want the jacket sleeves long because the arms are thrust forward while piping.

    Here's my normal thing, longish jacket sleeves and short-sleeved shirt underneath.



    On the other hand, there's the well-known Bob Shepherd look

    Last edited by OC Richard; 8th September 18 at 08:17 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  6. #14
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    Thanks for your response, Richard. Given that you're piping, and in hot weather, different rules apply, and comfort would definitely trump any rules about cuff lengths!

    Good point also about having your arms forward while piping, so that would also determine the length of jacket you choose, so that it looks good in that position.

  7. #15
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    As stated, it really is personal preference depending on where you draw your styling guidelines from. I wear mine like I've worn my military dress uniforms for almost 20 years, just past the third thumb knuckle (the one closest to the wrist) when relaxed. Mind you, this is a regulation thing, but it has really grown into my preferred fit.

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manu View Post
    I wear mine like I've worn my military dress uniforms for almost 20 years, just past the third thumb knuckle (the one closest to the wrist) when relaxed. Mind you, this is a regulation thing, but it has really grown into my preferred fit.
    That sounds good to me! (I didn't know my thumb had a 3rd knuckle until I just now checked.)

    So the regulations you speak of are American? What's your impression of the sleeve length on the two British soldiers I posted above? (The Pipe Major and Drum Major of the Pipes & Drums of the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, which band sadly no longer exists.)

    We pipers want the sleeves coming a bit past the wrists while playing, meaning the sleeves are rather long when the arms are down at our sides. (Unless you're Bob Shepherd.)

    Like here (the Pipes & Drums of The Highlanders)

    Last edited by OC Richard; 12th September 18 at 07:07 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  9. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    That sounds good to me! (I didn't know my thumb had a 3rd knuckle until I just now checked.)

    So the regulations you speak of are American? What's your impression of the sleeve length on the two British soldiers I posted above? (The Pipe Major and Drum Major of the Pipes & Drums of the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, which band sadly no longer exists.)

    We pipers want the sleeves coming a bit past the wrists while playing, meaning the sleeves are rather long when the arms are down at our sides. (Unless you're Bob Shepherd.)

    Like here (the Pipes & Drums of The Highlanders)

    Yes, I am referring to US military. The length on their sleeve looks good to me. I would wear it maybe 1/4 inch shorter, but I think the cuff being wider than my uniforms' cuff makes it look longer than it actually is. I think the sleeve being a tad longer definitely serves a functional purpose for you pipers, but your sleeves and the pipers' above do not seem too long in my opinion. I think there is a more contemporary trend among men to really shorten the fit of both sleeves and trouser legs. I like the slimmer contemporary cuts of suits, but I will always use my military uniforms regulations to guide sleeve and trouser length. The military has a funny way of re-programming one's brain

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