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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    Thanks, figheadair, that was a lot of useful information! So, given what you said above, do you think you could do a heavier weight tartan on your (single width?) loom by double-slaying lighter yarns like DC Dalgliesh used to do, and setting it up for an offset warp for a joinable plaid sett? Do you do custom weaves for people?

    If I'm faced with only obtaining single-width for this due to the custom nature of it, I'm probably going to need 16 yards (assuming 9 for the MBP kilt and 7 for the day plaid).
    At the moment my look is in pieces and stored away with no plans plans for any weaving at the momment. Sorry.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    27th October 09
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    I was afraid you'd say something like that.

    Let me ask you this, then. If the big mills all let me down, is there any reason this can't be done by a local artisan/hobby weaver on a typical floor loom? Assuming I could work closely with someone in my area who has their own loom and we could work out the yarn weight and colours, ends per inch, thread count for the sett and offset warping, and other details, there's nothing magical about making tartan that can't be done by anyone with a decent loom? It should just be a matter of setting the warp threads to the right pattern and then counting in each weft thread as they go, and it gets woven like any other twill cloth. Right?

    I mean, tartan used to be woven in households all across the Highlands (so I'm led to believe) on small looms rather than industrial machines. For instance, I'm watching videos like this one below on YouTube. Couldn't a local experienced artisan weaver produce the kind of cloth I'm looking for on a loom like this?

    *edit: the video tags don't seem to be working to embed a video, so you'll have to click the link.

    https://youtu.be/bH8ypklW7R0?t=113

  3. #13
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    I was afraid you'd say something like that.

    Let me ask you this, then. If the big mills all let me down, is there any reason this can't be done by a local artisan/hobby weaver on a typical floor loom? Assuming I could work closely with someone in my area who has their own loom and we could work out the yarn weight and colours, ends per inch, thread count for the sett and offset warping, and other details, there's nothing magical about making tartan that can't be done by anyone with a decent loom? It should just be a matter of setting the warp threads to the right pattern and then counting in each weft thread as they go, and it gets woven like any other twill cloth. Right?

    I mean, tartan used to be woven in households all across the Highlands (so I'm led to believe) on small looms rather than industrial machines. For instance, I'm watching videos like this one below on YouTube. Couldn't a local experienced artisan weaver produce the kind of cloth I'm looking for on a loom like this?

    *edit: the video tags don't seem to be working to embed a video, so you'll have to click the link.

    https://youtu.be/bH8ypklW7R0?t=113
    In principle, yes. You'll need to find a competent weaver as offset cloth, especially one with a selvedge mark or selvedge pattern is not beginner's work. You also want one who has a heavier loom for beating the cloth. Here's mine - https://www.facebook.com/31835354860...4006860373373/

  4. The Following User Says 'Aye' to figheadair For This Useful Post:


  5. #14
    Join Date
    27th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    It's nothing to do with the loom and all to do with the yarn. A 16oz cloth is usually woven with a 2/16 worsted yarn. Heavier yarns are harder to come by, especially dyes yarns in tartan shades. Get the yarn and the cloth can be woven. There are other ways of achieving something similar. In the past D. C. Dalgliesh produced an F1 weight by double slaying their K7 (medium weight) yarn. The result was a superb, dense, 18oz yarn. Unfortunately they no longer weave this weight.


    Getting a heavier yarn may be the difficult bit (not commercially viable I suspect); The rest however, is entirety possible. My experience is that I have to work out the loom draft for an offset warp as it's a mystery even for an experienced commercial weaver to understand. Once that is done, no problem.
    figheadair, a couple more questions if I may.

    What is K7 yarn? I can't find any reference to its size. Is it a 2/20 or something lighter? And if one were to double-sley them and treat each of these pairs as a single yarn for counting purposes, what would be resultant ends-per-inch be for an 18oz tartan?

    I'm also wondering what the complexity is with doing an offset warp. Not being a weaver, I would think it should be as simple as having the selvedge end at a halfway point in a colour block so it can be joined edge-to-edge at that point and end up with the same width block as the rest of the sett. Provided that the other selvedge side ends at a visually pleasing point in the pattern, of course. Is there something else to it that makes it complicated?

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