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  1. #21
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    In the past when I used to go to a Burns "do" locally in this part of the Highlands it was just more of an excuse to pop out for a wee dram and no one dressed formally or even bothered to don the kilt. Nowadays it seems as though its turned---hijacked even--- into an excuse for a more formal do.

    As to the supper/dinner thing I think for at least my lifetime(nearly 80 years) one dresses for dinner(formal) and one goes dressed smartly to supper( that varied----suit, sports jacket, pullover---- depending on the circumstance of ones host and here, local knowledge was helpful).The terminology was/is a very useful guide to what attire was/is required.
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 12th January 19 at 10:06 AM. Reason: Don't type when guests arrive!
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

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  3. #22
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    About the word "do", for our Americans who might not be familiar, in Britain you have a thing called a Hen Do which may be puzzling until you find out that there's also a thing called a Stag Do.

    (Hen Do: Bridesmaids' Party)

    I was introduced to "Hen Do" on a trip to Scotland when I read an article in The Scotsman about pending legislation to ban or restrict them.

    The article described bands of drunken rowdy girls who would take trains from the South up to Edinburgh and leave a wake of destruction (train cars, hotel rooms, etc).

    I see Hen Do's every day at work. They wear matching t-shirts saying "Bride" "Maid Of Honor" and "Bridesmaid" and are well behaved. (Mostly.)
    Last edited by OC Richard; 12th January 19 at 05:29 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    (Hen Do: Bridesmaids' Party)
    And, of course, if you happen to be a Glaswegian then a “Hen do(o)” is a female pigeon, doo being the name there for a pigeon.
    Reading an earlier post I wondered about the “Highlandisation” of the infantry you mentioned as I know regiments such as the KOSB always wore kilts as a lowland and borders regiment with their headquarters in Berwick on Tweed in England.

  5. #24
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    "What do you call a pigeon that goes to Switzerland for its holidays? "
    "A sgian dubh."

    ("doo" is "dove")

    Alan

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  7. #25
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    What about an Indian pigeon? A Hindu, or the last pigeon in Glaswegian.

  8. #26
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    Continuing hopelessly off-topic!
    "doo" has been used throughout Scotland at least since 1200 for a pigeon.
    Often as a term of affection e.g. in Orkney "ma peerie doo" = my wee dove
    We also have a "cushie doo" or just a "cushie" = a wood pigeon
    A "doo's cleckin" = twins (there are always two eggs in a rock dove brood)
    A "causey doo" = street (causeway) dove - sweet in public but a pain at home
    A "doo lander" = a wide brimmed cap

    Alan

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  10. #27
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    Swerving back towards the topic, a Burns supper usually follows a set pattern with the address to the haggis, immortal memmory, reply for the lassies etc. and as such tends to be a tad more formal than just a “do” which infers more of an ad hoc informal get together.

  11. #28
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    30th April 17
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    Looking for advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by EdinSteve View Post
    Swerving back towards the topic, a Burns supper usually follows a set pattern with the address to the haggis, immortal memmory, reply for the lassies etc. and as such tends to be a tad more formal than just a “do” which infers more of an ad hoc informal get together.
    Yes there is planning in hand for the evening, but as I said it's of a more relaxed feel to it also this is a lodge social evening so as we dress for lodge ie ( dinner suits and bow ties/ tuxs) powers at be decided to make it smart casual. I agree with Jock that dinner is more formal and supper casual dress hence the tweed jacket and waistcoat, plus I've got a proper black tie dinner the following evening so for that pc and bow tie, my wife will be attending both evenings. I do think times have changed I remember dinner was 12-00 noon and supper was around 17-00, but now it seems lunch at 12 and dinner at 17-00 have taken over.

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  13. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbuMaia View Post
    As one with probably the least experience in these matters, I was surprised to see so many people saying to make it more casual. Every Address to the Haggis I've watched on YouTube, everyone was in PCs with fly plaids. I came away with the impression that a Burns Supper was a black-tie affair.
    It often is, but doesn't need to be. It depends on the host(s), the nature of the group invited, the venue,.........
    I've attended those where the attempt was made to be formal, but the group were folk not especially well up on
    what Highland formal wear actually is. Less formal would have been better done. I think less formal is more
    appropriate. On the other hand, if all are already in possession of formal wear and just looking for an excuse, then,
    sure, why not. Burns certainly sat at many a formal meal with gentry and peers, but I think he would find many of
    today's celebrations sadly amusing. And for sure my attempt at the address would bring him to tears of both
    laughter and futility.

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