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  1. #21
    Join Date
    6th August 18
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    Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
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    MacDonald?

    So far my most frequently-asked question is "is that clan MacDonald?" I can see where the mistake might come in since both MacDonald and Armstrong are green and blue with red stripes.
    Clans: Armstrong and Guthrie on Father's side.
    Other heritage: Mostly German and some Polish on Mother's side.
    Kilts: One five-yard semi-traditional in Armstrong Ancient 13oz from Lochcarron

  2. #22
    Join Date
    7th February 11
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    London, Canada
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    I think I've reported this elsewhere, and years ago but it fits this thread.

    I had a three-point rural charge as my first parish, and in honour of their 175th anniversary, one of the three churches put on an historical fashion show. Of course, I kilted up - one of my earliest opportunities to "go public" in my togs. "Mother Bill" joined me with borrowed materials.



    As we were waiting to go into the church for the show (standing room only) one of my wonderful youngish parishioners approached and stuttering somewhat, asked in excited tones, "Is that... is it... is that... real?"

    I knew that she was asking about its provenance and my heritage but with a straight and earnest face I answered her, "No; you're imagining it. Actually, I'm standing here in my underwear."

    She saw the humour and we both had a good laugh.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Sinclair.

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  4. #23
    Join Date
    27th October 09
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    Kerrville, Texas
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    Since we're on the subject of clergy in kilts, here's a story I heard the other day from a friend who used to live in Baltimore. Apparently one of the local pastors or priests (sorry, didn't catch the denomination) used to wear a kilt at church. One day one of the old ladies was asking questions about it. She pointed at his sporran and asked, "so what do you carry in your scrotum?"

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  6. #24
    Join Date
    19th January 16
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    Victoria
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    Frequent questions

    I can't count the number of times folks have asked to take a picture with them , mostly women 😊

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  8. #25
    Join Date
    22nd September 15
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    I work nights and weekends and seldom get the chance to attend church but was able to get some time off to attend Easter services. I attended kilted and as soon as the services were over I was pounced upon by a lady who got to me so fast I think she jumped over 2 pews to get to me. She commented on how sharp I looked and asked about the kilt and the tartan. We had a nice chat with my baby sister smiling while my older sister who does not particularly care for my wardrobe choices had a rather pained look on her face. In the parking lot I was approached by yet another lady asking about my kilt. It seems that her husband has a kilt but seldom wears it. I sorely wished I could attend Mothers Day service especially since my mother has recently been diagnosed with breast cancer and it appears as though the treatment will be fraught with problems.

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  10. #26
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk J View Post
    I can't count the number of times folks have asked to take a picture with them...
    Interesting. That happens to me when I'm out performing on the pipes, and I always thought it was more about the bagpipes...
    Last edited by OC Richard; 13th May 19 at 03:40 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  12. #27
    Join Date
    23rd March 19
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    Seattle
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    I get asked for pictures every gig. That's not including all the shots people take when we're actually on stage. We'll often do "meet n' greets" before shows for promoters, local radio station promos, and VIP ticket stuff. Usually we'll do a half hour or so before the show. EVeryone gets their selfie with the band, we pretend to have a drink with them while we hang out and chat. We keep it short since we get asked the same questions every. single. time. Sometimes we get asked the same question twice in a row. Actually more often than you would believe.
    Even when I'm doing local gigs when back home, sitting in with friend's bands and stuff I get asked for pics between sets.
    As for the actual questions, I don't get asked 'the question' on the road. People usually want to talk about music, gear, their favorite song, and stuff like that rather than 'the question'. We do get asked about clans/tartans though fairly often. I DO get 'the question' at local bars/pubs though. Usually I just say "I'd love a glass of Yellow Spot, Thanks!" Sometimes it works.
    Last edited by Bad Monkey; 14th May 19 at 11:47 AM.

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  14. #28
    Join Date
    7th September 14
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    Edmonton
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    Q: What tartan is that?
    A: Mine (followed by which of the three when the asker still seems interested)

    Q: Are you Scottish?
    A: Maybe not as much as the toffee, but a bit

    Q: Are you regimental?
    A: I'm retired

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  16. #29
    Join Date
    25th September 04
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada 1123.6536.5321
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    I guess I am in the minority here.

    I don't prepare cute or funny responses to questions. And I try not to offer stock or pre-planned answers.

    I try to remember that it is just people. A guy in a kilt is usually pretty easy to try to strike up a conversation with, unlike some other visible minorities where you may not be certain how to start off a conversation.

    So I listen to the question. Sometimes they are just asking anything, just to start a conversation. Maybe they have heard the myth and use that that is the only 'in' that they know, to open a conversation with a guy in a kilt.

    Sometimes they just want to talk.

    So the first thing I try to do is smile. Then I answer as honestly and openly as I can. One way to have a conversation with someone is to share stories. This is why you so often get to hear about someone's great granny who came from somewhere in Scotland.

    Sometimes they ask one question, to lead into another question. Sometimes they see anyone in a kilt as an expert and have a valid question about Tartan, or Scotland, Bagpipes, or heck, about anything having to do with a kilt.

    I am one of those who is not only male but has a mild case of Asperger's Syndrome. Not only am I pre-disposed by gender not to be verbal, but it is harder for me, than the average guy, to see faces. So I have a harder time putting a name to a face.

    So I relish any excuse to talk to people when they ask about my kilt.

    The only time I have ever run into a problem was in Scotland where I am automatically branded as an "Ugly American" tourist. It was good that I am a kiltmaker as it opened the door when otherwise the locals would not talk to me or just snicker behind their hands.

    I find that if I walk down the street in jeans I am just another old guy. No one will even make eye contact with me.
    But in a kilt everyone smiles and even teenagers will usually respond if I say "Good Day". I find the kilt a great ice breaker.

    People just want to talk to other people. But many conversations never take place because there is no common ground. No way to open a conversation. This is why people who share a common interest, like in a club, that conversation flows almost naturally.

    The kilt can make a guy approachable and, unless he is uber-macho, safe and easy to open a conversation with.
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

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  18. #30
    Join Date
    24th October 18
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    Perth Australia
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    Here we go again...or so I thought.

    Being a professional workplace trainer I get the opportunity to fly around Australia quite a bit. I recently flew from Adelaide to Melbourne in cold weather, it was a Friday evening and I was kilted.

    I boarded the plane and sat in seat 2A, a elderly gentleman sat next to me and muttered to himself which I so happened to overhear "bloody hell".

    I thought, here we go again.... We were quiet for a long period of time, I was exhausted having presented the whole day so really didn't want to talk so I didn't.

    The urge for him was too great and after 20 minutes in the air he said, 'you look spectacular'. We chatted the rest of the way. Him reminiscing about the 'good ol' days' and me obliging and having felt guilty for not talking to him sooner.

    My thoughts: shame on me for automatically thinking he was negative and the whole time all he wanted to do was live the dream. My perspective of myself has since been altered...in a positive light.
    South African military veteran. Great grandson of Captain William Henry Stevenson of the Highland Light Infantry, Scotland (1880's) and brother to Infantryman Peter Mark Schumann of the 2nd Transvaal Scottish, South Africa (1980's).

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