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Thread: Angus County

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by byrdfeeder View Post
    My brother is planning a trip to Royal and Ancient St. Andrews in a few months. One the map, that looks very close to Monikie. Would it be a reasonable day trip? Would you cross the Firth of Tay or go around?
    I'm lucky enough to live in Angus, just a few miles from Monikie (pronounced locally min-eek-y ) and can vouch that it's one of Scotland's nicest areas, with the mountains only about 40 minutes away from the coast, and beautiful country - definitely both Highlands and Lowlands.

    To get to Monikie from St Andrews, you have to drive via Dundee - yes you do cross the Tay but by driving over the Tay Road Bridge. The alternative would be a train from Leuchars to Dundee, but a taxi out to Monikie I expect would cost c 20 - 30. It would take around 45 minutes to one hour to drive from St Andrews to Monikie. Monikie itself is a small village but is also the name of a parish - there are a number of small villages in what would have been Monikie Parish. It has a nice country park which is great for walks. Also Carnoustie is just a few miles from Monikie, and for a golfer, is worth a visit.
    Last edited by AbernethyCameron; 20th March 19 at 07:20 AM.
    To the King, over the water

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by byrdfeeder View Post
    My brother is planning a trip to Royal and Ancient St. Andrews in a few months. One the map, that looks very close to Monikie. Would it be a reasonable day trip? Would you cross the Firth of Tay or go around?
    It is an easy drive. I personally would drive over the bridge, it would save you some time.

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  5. #23
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    Angus County

    Thank you for replying with all of your helpful information. I've only seen pictures of Monikie, but it looks beautiful. Your descriptions helped me to better understand how Angus is said to have both highland and lowland areas. I especially thank you for detailed replies about traveling from St. Andrews to Monikie.

    Based on what I'm reading, it seems that residents in the Angus area in the 1650s would most likely not have worn kilts; however, I've found engravings that depict men in kilt-like clothing. Does anyone have any idea about whether the kilt would have been a lowland tradition in this time frame? Would the plaids have been in use this early?

  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbernethyCameron View Post
    I'm lucky enough to live in Angus, just a few miles from Monikie (pronounced locally min-eek-y ) and can vouch that it's one of Scotland's nicest areas, with the mountains only about 40 minutes away from the coast, and beautiful country - definitely both Highlands and Lowlands.

    To get to Monikie from St Andrews, you have to drive via Dundee - yes you do cross the Tay but by driving over the Tay Road Bridge. The alternative would be a train from Leuchars to Dundee, but a taxi out to Monikie I expect would cost c 20 - 30. It would take around 45 minutes to one hour to drive from St Andrews to Monikie. Monikie itself is a small village but is also the name of a parish - there are a number of small villages in what would have been Monikie Parish. It has a nice country park which is great for walks. Also Carnoustie is just a few miles from Monikie, and for a golfer, is worth a visit.
    Thanks for this first-hand information about the Monikie area. It's good to know how to pronounce the word. I've been doing it all wrong!

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by byrdfeeder View Post
    Thanks for this first-hand information about the Monikie area. It's good to know how to pronounce the word. I've been doing it all wrong!
    No problem at all, next time I'm up there I'll post a picture or two.
    To the King, over the water

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbernethyCameron View Post
    No problem at all, next time I'm up there I'll post a picture or two.
    That would be a real treat. I look forward to seeing them!

  9. #27
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    Sorry, this took ALOT longer than expected - here are a few images I took on a recent walk in Camuston Wood near Monikie, some of these show views across to Monikie village and to the church which is about 1k from the village. Also one of the 10th century Camus Cross, which I never even knew was there and stumbled across it. It's in the woods with no signs or anything to say it's there. Reputedly the burial place of Norse leader Camus who was killed at the Battle of Barry nearby. Hope the photo upload works!
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    Last edited by AbernethyCameron; 4th July 19 at 08:36 AM.

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  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbernethyCameron View Post
    Sorry, this took ALOT longer than expected - here are a few images I took on a recent walk in Camuston Wood near Monikie, some of these show views across to Monikie village and to the church which is about 1k from the village. Also one of the 10th century Camus Cross, which I never even knew was there and stumbled across it. It's in the woods with no signs or anything to say it's there. Reputedly the burial place of Norse leader Camus who was killed at the Battle of Barry nearby. Hope the photo upload works!
    The photo upload worked just fine! I thank you so much for sharing those pics. Monikie looks even more lovely than I had imagined. On the Monikie.org.scot website is a description written in the 1950s of the Panmure estate that includes flocks of wild swans taking flight. What a sight that must have been! I'm surprised to hear that the cross is off the beaten path, given that it receives so much attention in readings about Monikie. Could you make sense any of the engravings?

    My genealogical research continues, and I'm learning some fascinating things. It seems that my family is part of the "Little Scottish Cluster." The men in this group share a genetic relationship, with the most recent common ancestor having lived in Scotland about 1200 years ago. Apparently, that kind of relationship is rare. I'm still learning, and heaven knows there's so much to uncover. But it's a rewarding endeavor.

    Thank you so much for taking time to post these pics for me. It means so much to see the land my ancestors walked. Yours is a true act of kindness.

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by byrdfeeder View Post
    I just read a selection about the origin of kilts: "The Invention of Tradition" by Hugh Trevor-Roper (Columbia University). Wondering if anyone else has seen this and what your thoughts are about it. Are these fightin' words?
    Hugh Trevor-Roper - oh you mean he of the Hitler Diaries.

    Quote Originally Posted by byrdfeeder View Post
    Based on what I'm reading, it seems that residents in the Angus area in the 1650s would most likely not have worn kilts; however, I've found engravings that depict men in kilt-like clothing. Does anyone have any idea about whether the kilt would have been a lowland tradition in this time frame? Would the plaids have been in use this early?
    No, kilts (the feileadh beag at that date if it existed at all) and the feileadh mor (belted plaid)) was a Highland garment until the early 18th century and the visit of Goerge IV's visit to Scotland.

    Quote Originally Posted by byrdfeeder View Post
    That's great information! How did women wear the tartan? Would it have been a dress, shawl, scarf, any of the above?
    The answer depends on what timeframe, what social class the woman belonged to and where they lived, Highand or Lowland. Here's a starter for 10 - Musings on the Arisaid and other female dress.

  13. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    Hugh Trevor-Roper - oh you mean he of the Hitler Diaries.
    There may be a few people left that I haven't offended with that question. Please, be patient; I will get to you shortly. ;-) I seriously did not mean to offend, and apologize of I did.

    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    No, kilts (the feileadh beag at that date if it existed at all) and the feileadh mor (belted plaid)) was a Highland garment until the early 18th century and the visit of Goerge IV's visit to Scotland.

    The answer depends on what timeframe, what social class the woman belonged to and where they lived, Highand or Lowland. Here's a starter for 10 - Musings on the Arisaid and other female dress.
    I appreciate your reply about the belted plaid, and women's attire. I especially was intrigued by the well documented article you linked. I have a lot to learn, and this information will provide hours of reading and investigation, something I will enjoy.
    Last edited by byrdfeeder; 5th July 19 at 03:34 PM.

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