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  1. #11
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    24th July 19
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    Although the concept of "too high" or "too low" is getting dangerously close to the Kilt Kop concept, I do absolutely agree. The most common "mistake", such as it is, that I consistently observe are sporrans way down low. I think they're just not so convenient down there - more a decoration than a useful carry thing.


    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    I am one of those who is a big advocate of the "Sporran suspenders". I always keep three or four sets in my shop.

    .... Another issue is that many guys wear their sporran way too low. The sporran is not a crotch protector. ....

  2. #12
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    24th July 19
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    Many thanks for this great statement, Steve.

    And I have to say how brilliant I think your concept of three pockets is. I'll happily toss tradition out the window if I can have some functional pockets! Bravo.

  3. #13
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    24th September 04
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    To me - Too High or Too Low have nothing to do with tradition or style. They are practical considerations.

    A sporran worn so high that it hits the belt buckle or interferes with the bottom of a vest, most would agree is too high.

    A sporran that ends up under the belly causing puckers and distortion of the apron, or would hurt you if you ran, most people would agree would be too low.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  4. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Steve Ashton For This Useful Post:


  5. #14
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    22nd October 17
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    I have worn all three of the typical methods--chain, leather strap, or sporran hangers with a belt--at various times. All have worked just fine and have elicited positive comments from those who pay attention to such things. I think much depends on your outfit, intended activity, and comfort in your own skin.

    I also agree that it is possible to wear sporrans "too hight" or "too low." Steve's ideas can help you decide where to draw that line in your own sporran-wearing.

  6. #15
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    10th August 19
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    Coming late to the dance...as usual

    I have used all three. In my youth, my first sporrans were government issue and came with leather straps. They DID save the wool fabric of the kilt from the the sometimes abrasive effects of the chains (which many considered more “stylish”). For those of us who may have made a few too many trips to our favorite chippy and/or pub and are losing the fight with gravity, the newly popular “sporran hangers” are much more flattering to the larger-than-life physique these days.

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  8. #16
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by D McD View Post
    As best I can tell, there is no such as thing as any clear consensus on what constitutes "traditional" or "historical" kilt wearing practice, and with a wide spread of contemporary styles, that's an amorphous term too.
    I have become accustomed to the terms "traditional" and "historical" being used in a consistent and concrete way, in my studying various topics, and it was natural for me to apply these definitions to Highland Dress.

    Something is "traditional" if it goes back to an unknown origin and, through an unbroken chain of evolutionary stages, continues to be made and used today.

    To diagramme a traditional thing:

    Unknown Origin > Earliest known form > second known form > third known form > (etc) > Current Form

    The Current Form is, by definition, still being made and used.

    Now, what if we decide to go back along that unbroken evolutionary chain and pluck out a form of the thing that's no longer current? Say, in the diagramme above, the Third Known Form?

    Let's say that Third Known Form was used from c1800 to c1830.

    That would be a Revival, a Reconstruction, of a Historical thing.

    Also Historical are things which are extinct, thus:

    Unknown Origin > First known form > Second known form > Cessation of manufacture and use.

    Now what about the terms Contemporary and Modern? Traditional things are, by definition, contemporary and modern.

    But there are also Contemporary/Modern things which are not Traditional, which do not go back to an unknown origin.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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