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  1. #11
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    Thanks again, Barb...now the fun begins.

  2. #12
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    I learnt something here too. This is the second time this week I have read Barb write "mirror image". Thanks team.
    Last edited by Garth; 13th August 19 at 01:39 AM.
    South African military veteran. Great grandson of Captain William Henry Stevenson of the Highland Light Infantry, Scotland (1880's) and brother to Infantryman Peter Mark Schumann of the 2nd Transvaal Scottish, South Africa (1980's).

  3. #13
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    When selecting the thread to sew the pleats, one way to select the color is to look closely at the color of the yarn that goes down the edge of the pleat. If your stitches are kept small they will occur in every other yarn and be invisible.



    If you have to choose between two colors, most kiltmakers will advise picking the slightly darker color.

    Look closely to the examples by Barb. Her stitches are totally invisible.
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  4. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Steve Ashton For This Useful Post:


  5. #14
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    And that color will be the color in whatever solid color block lies along the pleat edge (i.e., youíre looking for the section along the edge of the pleat that has both threads that are the same color- not where the warp and the weft are two different colors). Itís easier to match your thread color to one of these solid color areas than to try to match one of the threads in a mixed color area.
    Kiltmaker, piper, and geologist (one of the few, the proud, with brains for rocks....
    Member, Scottish Tartans Authority
    Geology stuff (mostly) at http://people.hamilton.edu/btewksbu
    The Art of Kiltmaking at http://theartofkiltmaking.com

  6. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Barb T For This Useful Post:


  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    When selecting the thread to sew the pleats, one way to select the color is to look closely at the color of the yarn that goes down the edge of the pleat. If your stitches are kept small they will occur in every other yarn and be invisible.



    If you have to choose between two colors, most kiltmakers will advise picking the slightly darker color.

    Look closely to the examples by Barb. Her stitches are totally invisible.
    Just saw this today, Thanks, Steve, good example just hope my eyes co-operate, Ha Ha.

  8. #16
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    Don't strain your eyes by looking at the portions along the edge of the pleat that have two different colors. Find the portions that have the SAME color in warp and weft, and that color will be in ALL of the other parts of the pleat edge (unless the edge of the pleat goes diagonally across the tartan and eliminates the stripe at the edge of the pleat). I tried to show what I mean below - holler if it's not clear. The pleat shown below should be stitched in black, and it's easiest to figure that out by looking at the only part along the pleat edge that has threads that are the same color in both directions of the weave.

    Last edited by Barb T; 14th August 19 at 01:54 PM.
    Kiltmaker, piper, and geologist (one of the few, the proud, with brains for rocks....
    Member, Scottish Tartans Authority
    Geology stuff (mostly) at http://people.hamilton.edu/btewksbu
    The Art of Kiltmaking at http://theartofkiltmaking.com

  9. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Barb T For This Useful Post:


  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb T View Post
    And that color will be the color in whatever solid color block lies along the pleat edge (i.e., youíre looking for the section along the edge of the pleat that has both threads that are the same color- not where the warp and the weft are two different colors). Itís easier to match your thread color to one of these solid color areas than to try to match one of the threads in a mixed color area.
    Makes sense, thank you, Barb.

  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb T View Post
    Don't strain your eyes by looking at the portions along the edge of the pleat that have two different colors. Find the portions that have the SAME color in warp and weft, and that color will be in ALL of the other parts of the pleat edge (unless the edge of the pleat goes diagonally across the tartan and eliminates the stripe at the edge of the pleat). I tried to show what I mean below - holler if it's not clear. The pleat shown below should be stitched in black, and it's easiest to figure that out by looking at the only part along the pleat edge that has threads that are the same color in both directions of the weave.

    Thats great! Appreciate all the time youíve spent on this.

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