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  1. #11
    Join Date
    31st May 06
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    It may be that you are seeing the same thing I sometimes see, which is that the canvas interfacing *beneath* the aprons is puckering because it gets creased when I sit down -- especially if I've been driving.

    The crease in the interfacing causes the lighter fabric of the aprons to "pucker."



    Quote Originally Posted by NeighborhoodKiltGuy View Post
    These are the pictures. Attachment 37431

    That is the pucker I'm referring to.
    Descended from Patiences of Avoch | McColls of Glasgow
    Member, Clan Mackenzie Society of the Americas | Clan Donald USA

    "We have this hope, a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul." (Heb. 6:19)

  2. #12
    Join Date
    24th September 04
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    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
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    Or perhaps what you are dealing with is called 'slope'. This is where the front of a garment is worn lower than the back.

    A kilt made without slope will be the same length all the way around. A kilt made without slope must be worn with the top level and parallel to the floor.

    If you look sideways, do you see the front of the kilt lower in the front than in the back? If so there are two options. Wear the kilt the way it was designed to be worn. Or - have a kilt custom made with a sloping waistbanding.

    Perhaps this photo from the side will illustrate this issue of slope.



    There are three places where a belt will naturally sit on a human body and not move around when you move or sit.

    The upper strap in the photo is at the anatomical waist. A kilt worn like this will have the top or waitsbanding level with the floor.

    The middle strap is at a mid waist height and you should be able to see that the front is lower than the rear.



    This kilt is designed and made to be worn at Mid Waist Height. The front is 1.5 inches shorter and worn lower than the back and yet the apron falls in the front straight down without puckers. (Other than those caused by my hand in the pocket for the photo)

    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

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  4. #13
    Join Date
    4th August 19
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    Texas (for now...)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ashton View Post
    Or perhaps what you are dealing with is called 'slope'. This is where the front of a garment is worn lower than the back.

    A kilt made without slope will be the same length all the way around. A kilt made without slope must be worn with the top level and parallel to the floor.

    If you look sideways, do you see the front of the kilt lower in the front than in the back? If so there are two options. Wear the kilt the way it was designed to be worn. Or - have a kilt custom made with a sloping waistbanding.

    Perhaps this photo from the side will illustrate this issue of slope.



    There are three places where a belt will naturally sit on a human body and not move around when you move or sit.

    The upper strap in the photo is at the anatomical waist. A kilt worn like this will have the top or waitsbanding level with the floor.

    The middle strap is at a mid waist height and you should be able to see that the front is lower than the rear.



    This kilt is designed and made to be worn at Mid Waist Height. The front is 1.5 inches shorter and worn lower than the back and yet the apron falls in the front straight down without puckers. (Other than those caused by my hand in the pocket for the photo)

    Mr. Ashton, I see you're referring to the anatomical waist, and am a bit confused. You're saying that the top of my kilt's waistband should come over my ribs slightly, in the back and the side? And that the fell should start right where my hips and buttocks meet?

  5. #14
    Join Date
    24th September 04
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    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
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    That is correct. As you learn about the Iconic kilts you will began to notice that they are a garment designed in a time when all men's trousers were worn at the anatomical waist.



    When you measure an Iconic kilt there are three different lengths even though only one may be listed on the tags.

    The "Drop" of an Iconic kilt is measured from the center of the top straps, down to the selvedge. Above the top strap the kilt flares outward and is called "The Rise".



    The smallest part of the kilt is at the top straps and that is what cinches into the anatomical waist. The rise goes above that and the flare allows the top to go up, over the bottom of the ribs.

    The total length of the kilt is the Drop plus the Rise.

    There is then how far down the pleats are sewn and tapered. This area of the kilt in the back is called "The Fell".
    In an Iconic kilt the length of the Fell is 1/3 of the Drop. This is because it is assumed that the waist will be worn where it was designed to be worn.

    The Iconic kilt is perhaps the only garment where the wearer must change his expectations to the design of the garment instead of designing the garment to suit the expectations of the wearer.

    If you wear an Iconic kilt lower than where it was designed to be worn, The bottom of the Fell falls below the crest of the hips and buttocks causing the 'shower curtain' folds that you see so often.



    (notice please that the Fell stitching of this kilt has failed due to the undue stress being placed on them from sitting on the stitching.)

    If you are wearing a kilt with the bottom of the Fell too high, the pleats will splay outward.



    So yes when wearing an Iconic style kilt where it was designed to be worn, the top will be parallel with the floor and the aprons will fall straight down in front and the pleats will hang straight, vertical, and present a smooth appearance in the rear.

    ][
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

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