X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website The Scottish Trading Company
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Croft website Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 37

Thread: Rugby Wear

  1. #11
    Join Date
    22nd March 07
    Location
    In Doors
    Posts
    824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My thoughts, are that if the shirt was designed to not be tucked into pants or shorts, then untucked. But always up to the one wearing the shirt.

    Frank
    Drink to the fame of it -- The Tartan!
    Murdoch Maclean

  2. #12
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    8,178
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Highland Logan View Post
    Nice photos! Where was this, and +2 points for the goat hair!

    Frank
    Thanks! These were taken at USA Sevens in Las Vegas AFAIK the only annual international rugby tournament on US soil. I play the pipes when Scotland is playing! Flower Of Scotland and all.

    The 2020 USA Sevens will be in Carson, near Los Angeles, in the stadium that's home to the LA Galaxy, on February 29th (!)
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  3. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  4. #13
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    8,178
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cessna152towser View Post
    shirt tucked under kilt is better as it exposes the belt and shows more of the kilt.
    Also for me the top of the kilt is a place to tuck in the programme (as you can see in one of the photos).
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  5. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  6. #14
    Join Date
    10th January 19
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    235
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    If you do choose a belt, you should likely avoid one of those 'belly-plate' buckles in favour of a two or one tongue buckle.
    I apologize for the thread hijack, but what do you mean by "belly-plate" buckle?

    Kilt belts seem to come with a reasonably standard size buckle. Since I live in Texas, that's an average (or a smidge below average) size for a belt buckle.
    Trying to look good on a budget.

  7. #15
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    8,178
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Karl R View Post

    Kilt belts seem to come with a reasonably standard size buckle. Since I live in Texas, that's an average (or a smidge below average) size for a belt buckle.
    There are two traditional sizes of waistbelts worn in Highland Dress.

    One is the 2.5 inch wide Victorian "dirk belt", worn to support a dirk. Though originally civilian, it was adopted for military pipers in the 1840s and today is regarded as a "military style" belt. It generally came as a set with a crossbelt, which supported a sword.

    The other is the slightly narrower, and purely civilian, Evening Dress belt adopted in the early 20th century for use with the then-new Montrose jacket. It was generally worn alone, no dirk, no crossbelt.

    Here's full Victorian civilian Evening Dress showing the dirk belt and crossbelt



    This style of dirk belt and crossbelt has been maintained to this day by the army pipers



    Here are two sets of hardware: left modern chrome-plated, right vintage solid German Silver



    A set including plaid brooch, 1930s



    The narrower 20th century civilian Evening Dress belt appeared as part of the Montrose jacket



    By far the most common pattern of civilian Evening Dress buckle



    Here it is being worn

    Last edited by OC Richard; 23rd January 20 at 09:07 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  8. #16
    Join Date
    10th January 19
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    235
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    There are two traditional sizes of waistbelts worn in Highland Dress.

    Here's full Victorian civilian Evening Dress showing the dirk belt and crossbelt
    I hear what you're saying, but I'm still missing the point. Are the gentlemen in the photos wearing belly-plates, or not? It looks like they have an extra 1/2" (at most) in each direction over the ones I attach to my belt.
    Trying to look good on a budget.

  9. #17
    Join Date
    18th October 09
    Location
    Orange County California
    Posts
    8,178
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Karl R View Post
    I hear what you're saying, but I'm still missing the point. Are the gentlemen in the photos wearing belly-plates, or not? It looks like they have an extra 1/2" (at most) in each direction over the ones I attach to my belt.
    I've never heard the term "belly plates" and I'm not sure what it means.

    With ACW accoutrements the term "belt plate" is used for rectangular solid belt buckles, as opposed to a "frame buckle" which is an open rectangle with tongue.

    With Highland Dress I've generally heard them called "buckles" regardless of shape.

    Also not sure what you mean by "an extra 1/2 inch in each direction". The buckles are rectangular. Nowadays they're always "landscape" but in Victorian times they would often be "portrait". The photo I posted above shows both dirk belt buckle styles with the same hardware pattern.

    These Highland belts don't buckle like a belt used for jeans. The buckle has a loop for the belt (which loops back onto itself) on one side, and a tongue on the other side, that goes into a hook-like loop of metal. So you do the adjusting BEFORE you put the belt on.

    The rear of the buckle



    The belt

    Last edited by OC Richard; 23rd January 20 at 09:24 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  10. #18
    Join Date
    30th December 16
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    144
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Until I moved over The Pond, I used to go to almost every international match at Murrayfield. Until about 10 years ago I think I was one of the few to wear a Rugby jersey and kilt - it seemed that it was one or the other. It is much more common nowadays.
    You tend to see both, tucked in or hinging out. I personally am of the latter persuasion. Wear what is comfortable for you as both look fine in a casual environment.

  11. #19
    Join Date
    30th December 16
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    144
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One other thing - if you are ordering the official Scotland Jersey made by Macron, order at least two sizes larger than you usually wear.
    I bought the fan's jersey made of cotton. I usually wear an XL but had to purchase a XXXL and it is still a wee bit on the tight side.

  12. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Hirsty For This Useful Post:


  13. #20
    Join Date
    7th February 11
    Location
    London, Canada
    Posts
    8,456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Karl R View Post
    I apologize for the thread hijack, but what do you mean by "belly-plate" buckle?

    Kilt belts seem to come with a reasonably standard size buckle. Since I live in Texas, that's an average (or a smidge below average) size for a belt buckle.
    Yes, wear what you can get that you like. For Highland wear, the rectangular shiny buckles are generally for more formal wear so it would be mixing orders of dress. You’ll have to decide if you want to look like a Scot or a Texan.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Sinclair.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0