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  1. #1
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    1943 RS kilt looks civilian?

    I don't know what to make of this kilt

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/ORIGINAL-DA...p2056016.l4276

    It has every appearance of an ordinary civilian kilt: tartan in Ancient Colours, pleated to the set, civilian style straps & buckles.

    Yet, it bears numerous stamps the likes of which I've only seen on military kilts.

    Can anyone guess what sort of kilt this is?
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to OC Richard For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    I don't know what to make of this kilt

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/ORIGINAL-DA...p2056016.l4276

    It has every appearance of an ordinary civilian kilt: tartan in Ancient Colours, pleated to the set, civilian style straps & buckles.

    Yet, it bears numerous stamps the likes of which I've only seen on military kilts.

    Can anyone guess what sort of kilt this is?
    It's not regimental. Two thoughts.

    1. It was a private/personal kilt made for someone, likely to be an officer, by the regimental stitch. I've seen things like this before, especially wartime era kilts.

    2. It's more recent and the lining has been reused, presumably for the original owner.

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  5. #3
    Join Date
    15th January 19
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    Lake Zurich, Illinois
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    Any biographical info on M R Fairbairn? Was he actually part of the Royal Scots? I would suggest the liner was reused, but on second thought, it would seem to be a part that wears as much or more than the rest of the kilt on the body.

    I agree with you it is odd. "Military" but fringed; Hanger loops; Sporran Loops... Was this possibly modified at some point adding the incongruous features?
    I thought the "ancient", "muted" and the rest were more 1950s inventions of mills. Did so-called "ancient" colors come in much earlier?

  6. #4
    Join Date
    13th October 10
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    Powell River, BC, Canada
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    With a 24"-26" waist, as stated in the description, M. R. Fairbairn must have been the smallest soldier in the British army!

  7. #5
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    16th December 19
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    Austraila
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    Only thing I can thing of is some kind of wartime economy kilt.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    15th January 19
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    24-26" is not that extreme. I routinely see original surplus trousers about that range. Our modern Western Diets and habits don't contribute to such slimness these days. Remember that Britain on the whole was not as properly nourished as they should have been prior to the War. Lord Woolton contributed greatly to correcting the national diet and equalizing availability of quality food.
    If you are interested, here is a link to a video series done on the subject of British Rationing during the war. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...k_n9ebj12102sb

  9. #7
    Join Date
    16th December 19
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    So just thinking about the historical background and by 1943 Britain was in a war economy. How many military kilts where made in the later war years. The ones made must of had some cost cutting measures?

  10. #8
    Join Date
    2nd May 08
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howling Dingo View Post
    So just thinking about the historical background and by 1943 Britain was in a war economy. How many military kilts where made in the later war years. The ones made must of had some cost cutting measures?
    This extract from Hansard of 23 Jan 1940 suggests that none were to be made throughout the war. I'm assuming pipers and drummers were to be equipped from existing stocks.

    "The present position is that, for technical reasons largely connected with the possible use of gas by the enemy, kilts will not be worn in a theatre of war or for training, but will be replaced by battle dress. For walking out, however, all ranks in possession of kilts may wear them until worn out, but no further issues will be made during the war except to pipers and drummers. It has been decided not to maintain a supply of kilts because the raw materials and necessary manufacturing capacity must be devoted to the supply of dress actually to be used in war in present conditions. The stock of kilts in hand is 12,229, and 12,684 remain to be delivered by manufacturers under existing contracts. This stock would be quite inadequate to meet further issues for walking-out purposes on the scale anticipated. Moreover, the dissipation of this stock during war-time would make it impossible to fulfill the pledge that has been given that kilts will be available for ceremonial and walking out purposes after the war. Should the supply position alter at any time in the future, I should be prepared to look into the matter again."
    From:https://api.parliament.uk/historic-h...egiments-kilts
    Last edited by Bruce Scott; 26th January 20 at 12:37 AM.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    15th January 19
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    Lake Zurich, Illinois
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    Sale ended unsold. The seller has a large number of 'military' and 'vintage' items for sale, authenticity tbd.
    Quoting from Matt Newsome's blog, "Sometime after WWII, the tartan woolen mills began to offer, along side the normal dark tartans, versions of those same tartans in lighter shades. They called them “ancient” because they were meant to represent what a piece of old, worn tartan, faded with age, might look like."
    So if we agree the fabric was made as an ancient colors, then it most certainly would be a fraudulent military kilt.

  12. #10
    Join Date
    16th December 19
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    Austraila
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    Perhaps it could a officers private purchase kilt? An officers commission in 1943 who wanted a walking out kilt.

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