X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Freedom Kilts website Scotweb websiten Burnetts and Struth website Celtic Croft website
Xmarks advertising information Celtic Corner website Xmarks advertising information Houston Kiltmakers Xmarks advertising information

User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11
    Join Date
    27th October 09
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    5,420
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hmm, those are interesting precedents. They both seem more subdued than the one in my sample. Now I'm wondering what material this white thread is. It looks like a fat white wool yarn, but I'll probably have to yank some of it out and see.

    I am assuming that both of your examples had traditional kilting selvedges?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    3rd January 06
    Location
    Dorset, on the South coast of England
    Posts
    4,184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wool will dissolve in bleach so if you get a bit of it and leave it in bleach overnight is should vanish away.

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    27th October 09
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    5,420
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I ended up needing to cut about 10 inches of this RRS tartan for my quilt project, so I experimented a bit with the selvedge (which was trimmed off, not being useful for my purpose).

    The white thread is not wool. It's some sort of poly material; a little stretchy with a slick feel to it. Maybe even silk? My first test was to see if it could be teased out little by little with a needle and removed. That was a pain, and not worth the effort for the length of material I have. It's a tiny thread, and actually there are two of them in there. Getting them both out would nearly be impossible.

    Plus, as you can see below, when the white threads are pulled out, the selvedge appears more ragged. I don't know how it would behave over time.

    My second test was to use Father Bill's idea and just darken it with a sharpie (black felt-tip marker). That actually worked very well! To see if it would be colour-fast, I washed the strip in soap and water after using the sharpie pen on it, and it held. So that is probably the easiest solution here: just hide it with a sharpie. No one would ever notice it, I'd bet.

    Interestingly, the white thread seemed to shrink a bit in the washing process. As you can see below, on the top strip it is less noticeable in the areas that weren't touched up with the sharpie compared to the bottom strip that hadn't been altered.


  4. #14
    Join Date
    2nd January 10
    Location
    Crieff, Perthshire
    Posts
    3,878
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tobus View Post
    I ended up needing to cut about 10 inches of this RRS tartan for my quilt project, so I experimented a bit with the selvedge (which was trimmed off, not being useful for my purpose).

    The white thread is not wool. It's some sort of poly material; a little stretchy with a slick feel to it. Maybe even silk?
    I very much doubt that it would be silk. First and foremost, silk is much more expensive than wool so I cannot see why that would be used. Secondly, silk doesn't shrink like wool and would cause the selvedge to distort in the finishing process.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    27th October 09
    Location
    Kerrville, Texas
    Posts
    5,420
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    I very much doubt that it would be silk. First and foremost, silk is much more expensive than wool so I cannot see why that would be used. Secondly, silk doesn't shrink like wool and would cause the selvedge to distort in the finishing process.
    Yeah, I thought silk might be a long shot. I did the washing in cool water so the wool wouldn't shrink. I was just trying to see if the black marker would wash off. The change in the white thread was a surprise to me. It did not appear to shrink in length, but it just got narrower and less obvious. I may go back and pull some more of that white thread out so I can test it over a flame to see if it melts versus burns to ash.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    3rd January 06
    Location
    Dorset, on the South coast of England
    Posts
    4,184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Possibly rayon.

    I am currently still looking at 10 meters of similar tartan which can become three kilts for me - but unlike the usual problem I have, which is making a piece of fabric into one decent kilt, I keep looking at this and wondering how to cut it for the best outcome for all three.
    Should I make a long one and a shorter one, where should I place the set on the apron, I could pleat to the stripe, to the set, do box pleats - sometimes there are just too many options and the little grey cells, they become overheated.

    I have to go out and do some work later this week so perhaps it would be a good idea just to put it away until I can unfold it and gaze at it for a while, turning it about to consider the various options.....

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    1st August 09
    Location
    Augusta, GA, USA
    Posts
    355
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Father Bill View Post
    If you resort to that one, what about dye-water in an old (and therefore disposable if need be) fountain pen?
    No need to use an old pen; some of those have more value than folks think.

    You can get Jinhao X350 pens for a couple of US dollars from AliExpress if you are willing to wait. Brush pens are just as cheap. Using sample inks from somewhere like Goulet Pens or any of the fountain pen forums or subreddits can allow for color matching pretty close to the yarns of the the tartan.

    Jinhao X350, X450, and X750 are pretty decent starter fountain pens, too, if anyone is looking to try out using fountain pens as their daily writer.
    Death before Dishonor -- Nothing before Coffee

    Nihil curo de ista tua stulta superstitione

  8. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Deirachel For This Useful Post:


  9. #18
    Join Date
    7th February 11
    Location
    London, Canada
    Posts
    8,577
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Deirachel View Post
    No need to use an old pen; some of those have more value than folks think.

    You can get Jinhao X350 pens for a couple of US dollars from AliExpress if you are willing to wait. Brush pens are just as cheap. Using sample inks from somewhere like Goulet Pens or any of the fountain pen forums or subreddits can allow for color matching pretty close to the yarns of the the tartan.

    Jinhao X350, X450, and X750 are pretty decent starter fountain pens, too, if anyone is looking to try out using fountain pens as their daily writer.
    You're absolutely right! Actually, my best pen came from Goulet. I guess I was suggesting a pen in bad condition, but again you're right - some of the old ones are also some of the best.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, dreamer, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Canadian Sinclair.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0