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  1. #11
    Join Date
    17th June 11
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    We live in a world where veritably everything (including the evil covid-plague) is accessible to many more people in many more places, than their original point(s) of origin, and seemingly, the speed-of-spread happens faster and faster, all the time.

    Three articles of clothing which really come to mind as having become truly "worldwide garb" in our lifetimes are; the ubiquitous blue jeans (descended from canvas sailcloth and used as rancher-farmer-workman's garb), "tee shirts" and athletic shoes.

    Contemporary and utility-kilts are a nano-outtake of what was for centuries, a local garment. Others have called utility kilts an evolution of the traditional kilt, which is seemingly quite an accurate statement.

    Many other garments have evolved "wildly and out of control," especially in the past 200 years...

    ...could one realistically have expected the kilt to escape this uncontrolled, free-for-all, change (excuse the unintended pun), Scot-free?

  2. The Following User Says 'Aye' to James Hood For This Useful Post:


  3. #12
    Join Date
    28th December 20
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Hood View Post
    We live in a world where veritably everything (including the evil covid-plague) is accessible to many more people in many more places, than their original point(s) of origin, and seemingly, the speed-of-spread happens faster and faster, all the time.

    Three articles of clothing which really come to mind as having become truly "worldwide garb" in our lifetimes are; the ubiquitous blue jeans (descended from canvas sailcloth and used as rancher-farmer-workman's garb), "tee shirts" and athletic shoes.

    Contemporary and utility-kilts are a nano-outtake of what was for centuries, a local garment. Others have called utility kilts an evolution of the traditional kilt, which is seemingly quite an accurate statement.

    Many other garments have evolved "wildly and out of control," especially in the past 200 years...

    ...could one realistically have expected the kilt to escape this uncontrolled, free-for-all, change (excuse the unintended pun), Scot-free?
    Very well said!
    John A. Latimer: USAF veteran, Father of five, Hospital worker

    Just Enjoying Life...

  4. #13
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by brendanthetraveller View Post
    In Scotland I have never seen anyone wearing a Utilikilt so can someone explain to me why do they call it a Utilikilt?

    The line is however drawn when a manufacturer changes the fundamental construction.
    As was mentioned above, the Utilikilt was invented by a guy in Seattle. His philosophy was in line with yours, I think, because

    1) he didn't call his creation a "kilt" due to its completely different construction and purpose, instead inventing the portmanteau word Utilikilt (utility + kilt).

    2) he vowed to never make a Utilikilt in tartan, once again to make a clear distinction between his creation and kilts.

    How well I remember the first time my bandmates and I saw Utilikilts! Our Pipe Band was competing at a Highland Games here in California, and Utilikilt showed up with a booth. It was surrounded by a mob of people, money in hand, buying Utilikilts as fast as the employees could sell them.

    The reaction of the Pipe Band people was the opposite: I heard only disparaging remarks about "wrinkly skirts" etc.

    Yet within five years, at our local Games, there were as many Utilikilts as traditional kilts to be seen.

    Soon, predictably, dozens of copycat makers appeared to cash in on Utilikilts' success. They're mass produced in Pakistan now.

    In spite of the copycats, here on the West Coast USA nearly all the ones I see people wearing are actual Utilikilts. I work at Disneyland where (until the Covid shutdown) I saw tens of thousands of The General Public, and I would see men in Utilikilts nearly every day. Safe to say I see a hundred men in Utilikilts for every man I see in a traditional kilt.

    From the beginning Utilikilts had nothing to do with Highland Dress, but had their own unique "fashion culture", usually involving Doc Martens (the higher the better) black t-shirts, lots of hair, and tattoos.

    Utilikilts are intended to be worn like jeans, lower around the hips, and generally are worn longer than kilts, from the middle to the bottom of the kneecap.

    I do occasionally see Utilikilts worn with kilt hose and sporrans but it doesn't look quite right to me.

    Here's a good example of the Utilikilt fashion culture

    Last edited by OC Richard; 3rd February 21 at 07:22 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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