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  1. #21
    Join Date
    18th October 09
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktk1961 View Post
    Wow, that tie you posted is incredible. And would be beautiful with my Colquhoun ancient tartan. Any idea where it's from ...?
    It's the tie of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, I do believe. So only a member or ex-member of that regiment would be wearing it.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    21st March 17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ktk1961 View Post
    Wow, that tie you posted is incredible. And would be beautiful with my Colquhoun ancient tartan. Any idea where it's from ...?
    A similar looking tie is this one from the Army Benevolent Fund charity. Sales help support the charity as well.



    https://soldierscharityshop.org/coll...ts/charity-tie
    Descendant of the Gillises and MacDonalds of North Morar.

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  5. #23
    Join Date
    22nd October 17
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    Grump-

    The winged collar is a very old style. It was the most common style during the Victorian era and right through World War I. For a long time, the collars were removable, so that you could wash your dirty collar while still getting another day's wear out of the shirt. Men with less money wore disposable paper collars. I remember finding a box of them when cleaning out the "trunk room" in my house in Florida, which was built by my great-grandfather in 1917.

    The Prince of Wales (later Duke of Windsor) popularized the "turndown" collar for formal dress during the 1920s-30s. He was quite influential in menswear generally and introduced a number of items and details that remain popular and "traditional" today.

    I tend to favor the wing collar for black tie, myself, but I am generally partial to the "historical" sorts of styles, especially for formal events. Others may have different preferences.

    Happy kilting,
    Andrew

  6. #24
    Join Date
    6th July 07
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    The Highlands,Scotland.
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    I well remember my fathers cutting comment of some 60 years ago when my brother turned out to some evening do wearing a wing collar! To quote;"Take that damn shirt off! You look like a Dickensian clerk!'' My brother had the last laugh though, my father bought him half a dozen shirts with suitable drop down collars to stop him borrowing his father's shirts!
    Last edited by Jock Scot; 31st March 21 at 06:26 AM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

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