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  1. #11
    Join Date
    21st May 08
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    Inverness-shire, Scotland & British Columbia, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troglodyte View Post
    Yes, the sawing of the selvedge at the back of the legs has long been a problem
    I've no experience in warfare conditions, obviously, but our problem, as children, was at the top of the knee cap, where the wet edge made frequent contact with the skin.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    1st September 21
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    Idaho
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jock Scot View Post
    Once endured, never forgotten! Which is why most country sportsmen wear plus 4’s out on the hill. Well, that and the ticks, midgies and horse flies too.
    I apologize, but “plus 4”? What does that mean?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    1st September 21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThistleDown View Post
    I've no experience in warfare conditions, obviously, but our problem, as children, was at the top of the knee cap, where the wet edge made frequent contact with the skin.
    Modern fabrics have done wonders for the lowly, foot-slogging infantryman. That being said, soaking wet or knee deep in mud is miserable no matter what new wonder fabric your uniform is made of. In the summer of 2004, I was in the lovely little hamlet of Fallujah, Iraq. I’d have beaten someone black and blue to wear a kilt. 120*F is too hot for trousers…

  4. #14
    Join Date
    3rd January 06
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    Dorset, on the South coast of England
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    Quote Originally Posted by Recon1342 View Post
    I apologize, but “plus 4”? What does that mean?
    Basically, britches - short trousers which are gathered into a cuff at the knee.
    The plus 4 means that they are 4 inches longer than the actual measurement to the knee and they are a fairly loose fit which makes them the ideal choice for activities where there is a lot of bending, stooping, leaping or creeping about.
    Other options were plus 2, 6 or even 8s, but the plus 4 seems to have stood the test of time.

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  5. The Following 3 Users say 'Aye' to Pleater For This Useful Post:


  6. #15
    Join Date
    20th August 11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Recon1342 View Post
    Modern fabrics have done wonders for the lowly, foot-slogging infantryman. That being said, soaking wet or knee deep in mud is miserable no matter what new wonder fabric your uniform is made of. In the summer of 2004, I was in the lovely little hamlet of Fallujah, Iraq. I’d have beaten someone black and blue to wear a kilt. 120*F is too hot for trousers…
    120*F is too hot for anything

  7. The Following User Says 'Aye' to jf42 For This Useful Post:


  8. #16
    Join Date
    6th July 07
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    The Highlands,Scotland.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Recon1342 View Post
    I apologize, but “plus 4”? What does that mean?
    No need to apologise my dear chap. If you don't know, then you do what any sensible person does and asks.

    Anne the Pleater has answered your question perfectly.

    Plus 4's being worn, left of centre and by the people leading the ponies.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Jock Scot; 13th September 21 at 04:27 AM.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  9. #17
    Join Date
    20th August 11
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    The painful truth

    Colonel David Stewart of Garth, renowned compiler of Highland lore,
    recounted in his 1822 magnum opus Sketches of the Highlanders that during the miserable campaign on the Waal in the winter of 1794-95- "the 42nd were remarkably healthy; for, from the landing at Ostend in June, till the embarcation in April, the deaths in battle and by sickness had been only twenty-five- a small number, considering the length of the service, the fatigue they underwent, and the severity of the weather to which they had been exposed." (Sketches I, Part III, Section VIII).

    This was, according to Col. Stewart, the healthy effects of wearing the philabeg.

    "Indeed, where sickness has prevailed among Highland soldiers, it has in general been occasioned less by fatigue, privations, or exposure to cold, than from the nature of the provisions, particular animal food, and from clothing unnecessarily warm. In the march through Holland and Westphalia in 1794 and 1795, when the cold was so intense that brandy froze in bottles, the Highlanders, consisting of the the 78th, 79th, and the new recruits of the 42d, (very young soldiers), wore their kilts, and yet the loss was by all comparison less than that sustained by some other corps." (Sketches II, 246)

    Painful it is to record, however, that Stewart might have been gilding the lily, somewhat since from the journal of an anonymous officer with the army in 1794-95 we learn that:
    "14th December....The highlanders, at this time, from the severity of the weather, were under the necessity of leaving off wearing their kelts, or short petticoats, and were furnished with pantaloons or close trousers which were much more comfortable for them; The French had distinguished them by the name of “Vrai Sans-Culottes."

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