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  1. #1
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    16th March 06
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    Replace a fringe?

    Hi- I've done some searching and can't seem to find an answer. I have a 6-yard solid coloured tweed kilt that I'm wishing I has specified with a bit more interest/adornment. One thing I very much wish I had requested was a contrasting coloured fringe.

    How difficult to accomplish is this? I wouldn't attempt it myself, what with me possessing no knowledge, skill, nor equipment. Therefore, I would have this done by a tailor.

    So I suppose what I'm asking, is this something that a skilled generalist tailor could accomplish, or would I need a kilt specialist? And how big a job would it be?

    If it matters, it's a traditionally made kilt- though primarily machine rather than hand stitched. I can post photos of its construction if that would be useful.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Paco500; 8th September 21 at 01:36 AM. Reason: Clarification
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  2. #2
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    14th June 21
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    As a tailor's hands are needed, it might be best to return it to the original kilt-maker.

    If it is within a reasonable period of time, they may still have some of the material, or sufficient remnants, to make a fringe, and could make the result the best you could hope for.

    Alternatively, undoing the stitching along the turned-back edge may reveal enough material that could be cut off and modelled to form the fringe you want.

    Or you could get an appropriate length of similar tweed that contrasts nicely, and make a fringe from that - only half and inch or so would actually be visible when finished.

  3. #3
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    I definitely want contrasting. Should a skilled tailor be able to do this even without specialist kilt knowledge?
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  4. #4
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    I would say that anyone handy with a needle and thread would produce the desired result - a High Street alterations service should be able to do it.

    If you can source a suitable length of material that can have several rows of the yarn removed (weft) the warp yarns will naturally form the fringe.

    I would guess a piece the length of the apron edge, by maybe four to six inches wide, so as to allow about half an inch fraying along the cut edge, would be about right. Not having seen the kilt in question, I can only guess, but it may be just as easy to leave the kilt as it is, and sew the fringing strip to the inner surface - only you (and, of course, all of us here on the forum) would ever know...

    If going to a non-kiltmaker tailor or seamstress, a diagram showing the fringe edge construction would greatly useful, to show how it is folded, enclosed, and fringed to give the desired result. The fringing strip is folded along its length to bring the two cut edges together, one slightly behind the other, so that when frayed the edge show two lines of fringe.

    I am sure though, if you felt confident, you could do it yourself well enough.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for helping here.

    Here are two photos that will hopefully illustrate how it's put together. The 'fold back' (? know know proper terminology) is even all the way down the apron, and the fringe is two rows. I think in my ideal world, I would like to insert a contrast colour between the two rows of existing fringe.

    As far as a diagram for the contraction of the kilt- can you point me in the right direction of an online resource? I suspect the issue is my google skills rather than anything else- but I've not found a diagram that shows the constructions of the fringe. The YouTube videos I've seen that address it seem to assume a base knowledge that I don't have.

    Thanks again.

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  6. #6
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    The pictures help greatly.

    The fringe you have is the simplest form, as the edge of the front apron has been folded back, and then folded forward again, zig-zag fashion, and stitched all the way down the edge of the apron. A half-inch or so has been left standing proud of the stitching, and this bit has been frayed to form the fringe.

    I think that, to get with effect you want, you will have to undo the stitching along the base of the fringe, down the edge of the apron, in order to access the 'pocket' in which to insert the new piece of material for fringing.

    You will probably have to undo the stitching along the inner edge of the fold-back, so as to provide enough of the original fringe to be visible behind the new fringe when that is in place. I have to say, I think a contrast fringe will look good on that kilt.

    You could also try removing the waist-band piece, too, and replace that with the new contrast cloth, if you think the kilt will take it.

    As for pictures, Google & Co. usually answer well enough, but Barbara Tewsbury has already written the last word on kilt-making 'how-to' (her contact details are on the right hand side panel) and the instructions in her book are easy to follow.

  7. #7
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    Thanks very much for your help here. I think I will have to buy ‘The Book’.
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