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  1. #1
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    79th foot regiment uniform details?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Munro_Ferguson

    Came across this portrait; his bio says he served in the 79th foot regiment, but I have never seen epaulettes in such a strange shape & form? Does anyone have any more examples or details about it?

    Thanks
    Last edited by Kriegbert; 23rd October 21 at 04:44 PM.

  2. #2
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    Probably from his time as Commander of the 79th (18351841) and possibly denoting some form of Court or Appointment dress. The Highlanders' Musuem should be able to answer the quesiton.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kriegbert View Post
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Munro_Ferguson

    Came across this portrait; his bio says he served in the 19th foot regiment, but I have never seen epaulettes in such a strange shape & form? Does anyone have any more examples or details about it?

    Thanks
    The shoulder decorations are the 'wings' that originally denoted the regiment's flank companies but which were authorised for all ranks c.1830 at which time flank company distinctions were abolished for Highland corps. Colonel Munro appears to be wearing pantaloons of the 79th's Cameron of Erracht sett, uniform for mounted duty as appropriate for the Commanding Officer and Adjutant.
    Last edited by jf42; 23rd October 21 at 02:32 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jf42 View Post
    The shoulder decorations are the 'wings' that originally denoted the regiment's flank companies but which were authorised for all ranks c.1830 at which time flank company distinctions were abolished for Highland corps. Colonel Munro appears to be wearing pantaloons of the 79th's Cameron of Erracht sett, uniform for mounted duty as appropriate for the Commanding Officer and Adjutant.


    Private Alexander Ritchie of the 79th wearing simple white "wings", painting dated 1833.

    Image from: https://www.rct.uk/collection/407085...on-highlanders
    Last edited by Bruce Scott; 26th October 21 at 03:25 PM.

  5. #5
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    Not a Highland officer but here, for comparison, is portrait from ca 1845 of William Munro, Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 39th Dorsetshire Regiment, with shoulder wings of comparable design.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Lieutenant and Adjutant William Munro.  39th (Dorsetshire) .jpg 
Views:	133 
Size:	137.5 KB 
ID:	40857

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jf42 View Post
    Not a Highland officer but here, for comparison, is portrait from ca 1845 of William Munro, Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 39th Dorsetshire Regiment, with shoulder wings of comparable design.


    Excellent example. I wish I could find a photograph of it in real life! At the moment trying to scour through british army manuals searching for a reference to this thing.

  7. #7
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    No portrait photos at that date, the technique was in the early stages of development and only they very wealthy, like the royal family could afford it by c.1850.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by figheadair View Post
    No portrait photos at that date, the technique was in the early stages of development and only they very wealthy, like the royal family could afford it by c.1850.
    Ah daguerrotypes were fairly established by then, but actually, I meant recent photos of vintage items for example in museums! I doubt portrait photos would even show much detail given the state of the tech at the time.

  9. #9
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    Viz, one a set of calotype images from the studio of Edinburgh photographers
    David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson,
    showing men of the 92nd (Gordon) Highlanders
    at Edinburgh Castle, circa 1845. Sadly, no officers were available.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ZduZs.jpg 
Views:	22 
Size:	147.5 KB 
ID:	40858
    Last edited by jf42; 26th October 21 at 09:26 AM. Reason: whim

  10. #10
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    Last edited by Kriegbert; 2nd November 21 at 06:37 PM.

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