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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    How does one wear the baskethilt broadsword?

    I was recently gifted with a baskethilt broadsword of decent quality. It has a two-ring military-style scabbard. How would it be suspended/carried when wearing a modern kilt, on the rare occasions when I might do so? I have seen them worn by drum majors, but have not had the opportunity to examine the type of belt/harness involved...

    Thank you for any input, ideas, and/or photos.
    Last edited by MacNachtan Archer; 3rd February 22 at 03:04 AM.

  2. #2
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    18th October 09
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    EDIT:

    Highland military officers have long used a specific sort of sword-belt. It goes over the shoulder, having rings holding the two narrow belts that go to the scabbard, and a hook for hooking up the sword in high reversed position for marching. (Here's a new one from L&M Nova Scotia, it doesn't have the sword belt plate attached.)



    Here you can see the swords hooked up and reversed



    And a clearer photo showing the hooked-up scabbard with sword removed



    Or, you can get one of these things, I don't know what they're called but they have a clip to attach the the loop, a place for the narrow belts that go to the scabbard rings, and a hook to hook up the sword, reversed, for marching



    Last edited by OC Richard; 4th February 22 at 05:50 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  4. #3
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    The white leather over-the-shoulder style was (and still is) worn by Highland officers in Full Dress and No1 Dress.

    There's a different style for non-Highland British officers where the two narrow belts (slings) that go to the scabbard are attached to the waistbelt, and the waistbelt has a narrow shoulder strap also attached which helps support the weight of the sword.

    Here's a reproduction of a Victorian British officer's belt. You can see the two attachment points for the two slings, the hook, and the shoulder belt

    ]

    Done in brown leather, with a different buckle, and with the slings connecting to a frog designed for the Service Dress scabbard (no rings) it's worn in Service Dress even today by officers, the familiar Sam Browne belt:

    Last edited by OC Richard; 4th February 22 at 07:52 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  6. #4
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    Shaun Maxwell
    Vice President & Texas Commissioner
    Clan Maxwell Society

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  8. #5
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    For sure it depends on whether you're wearing the sword as part of a military uniform, or in civilian Highland Dress.

    Up until the late Victorian period it was common for civilians to wear swords in full Evening Dress.

    IIRC the civilians wouldn't be wearing the slings going to rings on the scabbard, but the sort of scabbard with a stud at the top that goes into the frog built into the Highland crossbelts. (The long slings on military officers' swords was due to them being on horseback.)





    This crossbelt appears to have the same built-in frog that modern "pipers" crossbelts do

    Last edited by OC Richard; 4th February 22 at 04:49 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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