X Marks the Scot - An on-line community of kilt wearers.

   X Marks Partners - (Go to the Partners Dedicated Forums )
USA Kilts website Burnetts and Struth website Celtic Croft website Celtic Corner website Houston Kiltmakers

User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    21st October 21
    Location
    Memphis,Tn,USA
    Posts
    305
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    I'm planning a trip and looking for recommendations

    I'm planning on going to Ireland and Scotland in late July - early September, where should I go and what should I do? I have been to Scotland before, 20 years ago, but I didn't really see much except the highlands as I drove through them. I am also going to England and Wales if anyone has any recommendations there as well. I lived in England for a year so I know it relatively well. I will be getting around mainly by train and bus. I love history, have a degree in it, but I also would like to see a bit of the country as it is now as well as in the past.
    Last edited by kilted2000; 14th May 22 at 07:43 AM. Reason: added details
    “Never wear anything that panics the cat.”- P.J. O’Rourke
    “A man should look as if he has bought his clothes (kilt) with intelligence, put them (it) on with care, and then forgotten all about them (it).” Paraphrased from Hardy Amies
    Proud member of the Clan Urquhart.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    21st December 05
    Location
    Hawick, Scotland
    Posts
    11,057
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The south of Scotland has a lot going for it. Turn left at Gretna for the Solway Coast and the Galloway forests. The train will take you as far as Dumfries where one of our members, Pour1Malt, is co-owner of Ferintosh Guest House along with his wife. Bus will take you from Dumfries to many of the coastal resorts or start points for forest walks or the train will take you the long way round via Kilmarnock and Ayr and then back south to Stranraer.
    Or continue north to Glasgow, my favourite city, renowned for its friendly people who will attempt to make conversation with you if you can understand the local dialect. In summer season there are river boats from Glasgow to the Clyde Coast.
    I'm on the tourist road, A7 between Carlisle and Edinburgh. An interesting route if you are into history due to the many historic tower houses, which were basically small castles or fortified farm houses, built in the days of Anglo-Scottish border feuds. No trains on this route but there are buses from Carlisle to Hawick and Galashiels from where you can catch a train to horrible Edinburgh, I recommend you give it a miss. If you do have the misfortune to land in Edinburgh, catch a train from there for a scenic ride across the Forth and Tay bridges to the vibrant city of Dundee where you can climb the Dundee Law in the middle of the city, enjoy good shopping, some interesting museums including the new Victoria and Albert and a fine waterfront promenade along the shoreline of the Firth of Tay.
    Last edited by cessna152towser; 14th May 22 at 09:27 AM.
    Vice-President and Regional Director for Scotland for Clan Cunningham International, and a Scottish Armiger.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    16th February 13
    Location
    Wolverhampton, West Midlands, England
    Posts
    1,672
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've just returned from a week in Edinburgh. The one big negative is that it is over-run with tatty tourist shops selling cheap souvenirs. Apart from that, there are some great places to visit - it oozes history at every turn - and some very attractive places for walking nearby. I took a bus to Balerno, and walked back along the Water of Leith (about 10 miles), and also visited Rosslyn Chapel, and walked through Rosslyn Glen. I visited the village of Aberdour, which has a church dating from the 12th century, and walked along the Fife Coastal Path to Burntisland.
    (I was born in Glasgow, and spent most of my early years there, so have no axe to grind in recommending Edinburgh!)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    3rd March 15
    Location
    Estonia
    Posts
    355
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Both Edinburgh and Glasgow have lots to offer in a relatively small space - and are good bases to explore from. I was in Edinburgh in November with work colleagues and again a couple of time in February for the rugby. I also took the time to visit Rosslyn Chapel on the last trip - something I've been meaning to do for years.

    If you fancy a dram or two in Edinburgh, then you are spoilt for choice. Maybe an odd recommendation is Amber. This is the restaurant and bar beneath the Scotch Whisky Experience near the castle. The "experience" itself is a but touristy, but you can give that a miss and head straight downstairs for a great selection of malts and some good scran. I also like the Scotch at the Balmoral and Whiski Bar. Howies (at Waterloo Place or Victoria St.) is one of my favourite places to eat - and the Painted Rooster does a great breakfast.

    Otherwise my favourite places to visit are Kilmarten Glen (for ancient history), Mull (for the wildlife, Iona and Staffa), Skye (for the views), Glen Coe and Glen Nevis (for hiking), Speyside (for the distilleries), Bannockburn and Culloden (for more history) - it really depends what floats your boat.

    The Borders is often overlooked. I have a family connection to Castle Douglas, so our hols when I was a kid were often to Loch Ken, Kirkcudbright and around there. Caelaverock Castle is worth a stop - but there's plenty to do elsewhere.

    If you plan on visiting castles and gardens and the like - it might be worth becoming a member of the National Trust for Scotland who manage many sites. It's also valid in England and Wales and the cost of a full years family membership is about the same price as visiting 3 or 4 of their places (plus you get free parking). Historic Environment Scotland are the other main organisation responsible for managing various sites and run a similar membership scheme. It's worth checking both, if these are of interest.

    https://www.nts.org.uk/

    https://www.historicenvironment.scot/

    It is possible to stay at some of their locations and also worth checking out the Landmark Trust if you fancy staying somewhere with a bit of history. You can filter the search for Scotland, England or Wales if you want.

    https://www.landmarktrust.org.uk/
    Last edited by Tomo; 15th May 22 at 04:15 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    6th July 07
    Location
    The Highlands,Scotland.
    Posts
    14,950
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are travelling by car then that opens up far more choices. Trains and buses are pretty good too, but both choices here do limit operations somewhat. Whichever mode of transport you choose, a modest sized pair of binoculars are a must.
    " Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the adherence of idle minds and minor tyrants". Field Marshal Lord Slim.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    18th July 07
    Location
    North East Scotland
    Posts
    1,003
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Of course I would say come to the Northeast and go on the castle trail
    https://www.visitscotland.com/see-do...-castle-trail/

    Alan

  7. The Following User Says 'Aye' to neloon For This Useful Post:


  8. #7
    Join Date
    11th November 21
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    41
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Given you are planning to get around primarily by bus and train (and have already spent time in the highlands), I would suggest using Edinburgh as your base, and travelling to Fife and up the east coast, as well as doing some areas in the Borders.

    Edinburgh and its immediate surrounds can easily occupy a week – give it 3 or 4 days at a minimum if you can. All very accessible by bus/train (and within the city itself, often easiest done on foot).

    Glasgow people always like to claim that Glasgow is the place to visit, but much as I like the city and go there fairly regularly, it’s not a particularly tourist-friendly place (and any visitors I know who have taken advice to base themselves there rather than Edinburgh have hugely regretted it) – a day visit is very easy to do from Edinburgh.

    I would normally absolutely recommend visiting Galloway – and in particularly the coastal areas, which are stunning, and still relatively undiscovered compared to much of the Highlands. But they are really only viable if you are willing / able to hire a car, unfortunately, as they are not at all well served by bus or train.
    Last edited by Regimental; 16th May 22 at 03:34 PM.

  9. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Regimental For This Useful Post:


  10. #8
    Join Date
    3rd January 06
    Location
    Dorset, on the South coast of England
    Posts
    4,338
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    These days I carry a small compass and a tiny torch as they have proven useful for finding my way around both walking and driving.
    Many places have folk clubs and music sessions, some have an annual festival of music and dancing so it might be worthwhile checking what is going on during your stay and adjusting your timetable to avoid or encounter such events.

    I go to Sidmouth in the first week of August and have met up with people delighted to find the town overrun with music and dance, and some who are horrified by it all...

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0