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  1. #21
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    10th December 06
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    Quote Originally Posted by kilted2000 View Post
    I'm curious, how are you wrapping the plaid?
    I took it and wrapped it around my torso, over my shoulder and let the rest hang. I'm not sure how else to describe it. Perhaps I was doing it wrong, I've never worn one in this way I was simply trying to emulate the painting. Maybe I will do a video of it or something.

  2. #22
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    21st June 22
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    Waukesha, WI
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    Quote Originally Posted by McMurdo View Post
    The jacket and waistcoat are original from 1894. The fact that they even still exist and are wearable far outweighs the colour. Having said that I love the Crotal colour of this set. I am proud to be the custodian of these pieces.

    The color of that kilt jacket is beautiful. I'd like to have one made with similar tones and the closest thing I can find is Jacksnipe by Marton Mills:

    https://martonmills.com/wp-content/u...600x6001-1.jpg

    Do you, Glen, or anyone else for that matter have a better suggestion?

    Thanks in advance.

    Fr. Cliff

  3. #23
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    10th December 06
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    Quote Originally Posted by PiperPadre View Post
    The color of that kilt jacket is beautiful. I'd like to have one made with similar tones and the closest thing I can find is Jacksnipe by Marton Mills:

    https://martonmills.com/wp-content/u...600x6001-1.jpg

    Do you, Glen, or anyone else for that matter have a better suggestion?

    Thanks in advance.

    Fr. Cliff
    That is close, but I think there was a better suggestion earlier in the thread.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    3rd January 06
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    Dorset, on the South coast of England
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    The long plaid is basically the simple, most ancient form of the Roman toga, even before the ends were curved.
    The folds under the arm were used as pockets, called a sinus, spread for carrying fruit, for instance, or tied with a loop of cord for small valuables and the toga was - in far antiquity - worn over a loincloth and considered the mark of a Roman citizen.

    Only later was a tunica added, maybe made from something more washable than the woollen toga and the band of coloured decoration rose from the lower to the upper long edge of the fabric as worn.
    Over time the length also increased so it was wound elaborately - and was probably made of linin rather than wool - far easier to keep clean and not so insulating nor so heavy when it had become yards and yards of fabric.

    If you wanted to know the rank of an ancient Roman you'd look down, to the type of sandal and colour of the decorative stripe.

    The folds of the military drummer's plaid are made very precisely - I think they must be sewn in, and then it is drawn very tight to the body and trapped under belts etc.
    When worn more casually it is useful as it can be drawn closer or pushed aside according to the need of the wearer.

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

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  6. #25
    Join Date
    7th February 08
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    Glen:
    Are you considering commissioning a pair of tartan hose, as in the illustration?
    waulk softly and carry a big schtick

  7. #26
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    10th December 06
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhockin View Post
    Glen:
    Are you considering commissioning a pair of tartan hose, as in the illustration?
    I was thinking about it. For now the Gairloch pattern will have to do.

  8. #27
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    7th February 08
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    Quote Originally Posted by McMurdo View Post
    I was thinking about it. For now the Gairloch pattern will have to do.
    I totally understand; they don’t come cheap. However, rumour has it that a certain former kilt maker has an interest in making circular knitting machine kilt hose. Perhaps the challenge of making tartan kilt hose might appeal to him? ;0)
    Last edited by jhockin; 23rd June 22 at 08:31 PM.
    waulk softly and carry a big schtick

  9. #28
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    10th December 06
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhockin View Post
    I totally understand; they donít come cheap. However, rumour has it that a certain former kilt maker has an interest in making circular knitting machine kilt hose. Perhaps the challenge of making tartan kilt hose might appeal to him? ;0)
    The Gairloch hose were expensive enough. I do love Argyll hose and I seldom remember how much I spend on them, rather I like to think of them as an investment.

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  11. #29
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    18th October 09
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    I'm reminded of this tweed, centre gent.

    I've seen some vintage jackets in that colour but not so much nowadays.

    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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