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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Thomson View Post
    It's pretty easy to do if you want to, probably less labour intensive than fly plaids just need the bolt of cloth, that's all?
    Well yes, the bolt of cloth but then a purled fringe or what have you. Having tried it I will say it is rather cumbersome and should only be used if the weather demands it.

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  3. #32
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    Would a so called 'pipers plaid' be an alternative that would be close enough, except maybe easier to walk around in? I'm talking about something like this https://www.usakilts.com/pipers-plaid.html
    “Never wear anything that panics the cat.”- P.J. O’Rourke
    “A man should look as if he has bought his clothes (kilt) with intelligence, put them (it) on with care, and then forgotten all about them (it).” Paraphrased from Hardy Amies
    Proud member of the Clan Urquhart.

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by kilted2000 View Post
    Would a so called 'pipers plaid' be an alternative that would be close enough, except maybe easier to walk around in? I'm talking about something like this https://www.usakilts.com/pipers-plaid.html
    I would say that it is not a substitute for a Pipers Plaid in that this is strictly civilian while a pipers plaid would be for someone in a pipe band.

  5. #34
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    Looks so good on you! Just curious how you got it pleated in the black?
    Ontario commissionairs of clan Logan

    Hoc Majorum Virtus ( This is the valour of my ancestors)

  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patty Logan View Post
    Looks so good on you! Just curious how you got it pleated in the black?
    Pleated to the white line. I'll get some photos tomorrow.

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kilted2000 View Post
    Would a so called 'pipers plaid' be an alternative that would be close enough, except maybe easier to walk around in? I'm talking about something like this https://www.usakilts.com/pipers-plaid.html
    How much?!?!

    Good Heavens - I will have to treat mine with more respect, and maybe fit a padlock for those times I hang it up to dry out.

    Our weather is so much less predictable these days that a long paid taken along rolled up or worn can be a lifesaver.

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  8. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by kilted2000 View Post
    Would a so called 'pipers plaid' be an alternative that would be close enough, except maybe easier to walk around in? I'm talking about something like this https://www.usakilts.com/pipers-plaid.html
    Those photos don't do any favours for that plaid.

    The "long plaids" as they used to be called have gone through quite a bit of evolution over the years.

    BTW in the military they've never been the sole domain of pipers.

    Originally they're as seen in The Highlanders of Scotland, simply a length of tartan, fringed on both ends, loosely wrapped around the torso.

    Over the years some military men began wrapping them more tightly.

    Then some military men began arranging the folds in a regular way.

    Eventually it led, in recent times, to the folds becoming sewn-in pleats.

    This is how loosely they could be worn, in the army, in the mid-19th century



    Here's the Colonel and a senior Sergeant of the Argylls, c1890, neither of them pipers, both wearing long plaids.



    Here are Scots Guards pipers c1910 showing the random folds seen in the old days.



    This Seaforth Highlanders bandsman, serving in India I believe, has his plaid arranged neatly. I think this is the earliest photo I've seen of that.



    Nowadays all the military plaids are done neatly. It seems apparent where the pleats are stitched, on the yellow stripe.

    Last edited by OC Richard; 12th July 22 at 05:11 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  10. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by McMurdo View Post
    Well yes, the bolt of cloth but then a purled fringe or what have you. Having tried it I will say it is rather cumbersome and should only be used if the weather demands it.
    You don't necessarily need the fringe, there's historically precedent for those without them before they ever had a fringe.

  11. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Thomson View Post
    You don't necessarily need the fringe, there's historically precedent for those without them before they ever had a fringe.
    True enough. I decided to have it as I was trying to emulate Hugh Graham in the Highlanders of Scotland.

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    LoE

  13. #40
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    I have Velcro fastenings on my footwear and so only have a fringe on the front of the plaid - which I wear slightly shorter than the end which goes back over my shoulder as it is such a nuisance if it gets caught in the grip of the fastening.

    At least I wear it wrapped loose enough so there is no danger of strangulation.

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

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