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  1. #31
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    14th June 21
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    Quote Originally Posted by piperalpha View Post
    Troglodyte,


    Iíll likely get the second one made when I go to Scotland. Iím going to have a bespoke jacket made by Campbells of Beauly. They can measure me for the waistcoat at the same time.

    It time to keep an eye out for an old pocket watch and chain or two.
    Campbells' shop is like something out of a time-warp, and has remained virtually unchanged for decades and is worth going for a look-see even if you have no intention of buying.

    But beware. Whilst their stock is of the highest quality, they have prices to match, and there is a long waiting list for tailored work. The last time I enquired about having some work done, they refused my custom, saying all the estate work for gamekeepers' suits, etc, meant they were over-stretched.

    As Campbells get their cloths from the same sources as other Highand dress outfitters, you are just as likely to get the same quality of finished garment for a lower price from a different tailor - the only penalty is no C. of B. label.

    One suggestion I would make, is to pre-order your waistcoat - giving all your sizes and sending through the tartan you want used - so that it can be ready for a fitting when you go in person. Very few waistcoats are made in the way they once were - you should know you are wearing it, I was told by my tailor when I was young. That is, close to the body and cut to fit you shape exactly, so that very little 'cinching' is needed with the rear strap.

    Remember (and this is particularly important with the kilt) the waistcoat is exactly that, and not a hipcoat. With the kilt, is is best to get it to be long enough to cover the fastening straps of the kilt, and not come too far down in the front. Your kilt jacket will come only as low as the bottom of the stiching on the pleats of the kilt, so your waistcoat needs to be proportionately shorter.

    A good tailor who knows his craft (rather than someone who can just follow a sewing pattern) will be happy to make what you want, and if you have a picture of style, so much the better. Take a picture from the 1930s-50s - a period when they seemed to have the 'look' just right - and get that copied. You won't be disappointed.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    27th February 13
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    Winnpeg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troglodyte View Post
    Campbells' shop is like something out of a time-warp, and has remained virtually unchanged for decades and is worth going for a look-see even if you have no intention of buying.

    But beware. Whilst their stock is of the highest quality, they have prices to match, and there is a long waiting list for tailored work. The last time I enquired about having some work done, they refused my custom, saying all the estate work for gamekeepers' suits, etc, meant they were over-stretched.

    As Campbells get their cloths from the same sources as other Highand dress outfitters, you are just as likely to get the same quality of finished garment for a lower price from a different tailor - the only penalty is no C. of B. label.

    One suggestion I would make, is to pre-order your waistcoat - giving all your sizes and sending through the tartan you want used - so that it can be ready for a fitting when you go in person. Very few waistcoats are made in the way they once were - you should know you are wearing it, I was told by my tailor when I was young. That is, close to the body and cut to fit you shape exactly, so that very little 'cinching' is needed with the rear strap.

    Remember (and this is particularly important with the kilt) the waistcoat is exactly that, and not a hipcoat. With the kilt, is is best to get it to be long enough to cover the fastening straps of the kilt, and not come too far down in the front. Your kilt jacket will come only as low as the bottom of the stiching on the pleats of the kilt, so your waistcoat needs to be proportionately shorter.

    A good tailor who knows his craft (rather than someone who can just follow a sewing pattern) will be happy to make what you want, and if you have a picture of style, so much the better. Take a picture from the 1930s-50s - a period when they seemed to have the 'look' just right - and get that copied. You won't be disappointed.
    They are almost double what the more retailers are charging for a jacket and waistcoat. It’s nice to think a lowly person like myself having a jacket tailored at the same shop as the King. I’m okay paying significantly more for a bespoke jacket. It’s part of an experience.
    Last edited by piperalpha; 17th January 23 at 06:44 AM.

  3. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to piperalpha For This Useful Post:


  4. #33
    Join Date
    27th February 13
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    Does anyone know some good vintage pocket watch brands? Iím ignorant to which makers are good. I want to purchase one to go with my kilt

  5. #34
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    21st June 22
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    Waukesha, WI
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    Quote Originally Posted by piperalpha View Post
    Does anyone know some good vintage pocket watch brands? Iím ignorant to which makers are good. I want to purchase one to go with my kilt
    Itís a rather vast world of styles and makers. Some makers that come to mind immediately are the always reliable American railroad makers such as Waltham or Illinois (great mechanics but nothing subtle about them. And along those same lines donít disregard the Russian makers Molnija and Raketa. Excellent workmanship. For beauty you can pursue Patek or Omega to name a couple.

    Donít forget that whatever watch you get (do yourself a favor and buy the best quality you can afford - there are many forums such as this dedicated to pocket watches) itíll need to be serviced every 5-6 years, costing around 200-250 US.

  6. #35
    Join Date
    22nd July 18
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    Scottsville, NY
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    There are certainly a number of very fine watchmakers, past and present. Elgin is an American manufacturer dating back to the 1860s. Elgin was a high-quality machine-made watch that was at one time quite popular in the U.S. Enquiring at a jeweler that carries fine estate jewelry is an excellent place to start. My jeweler for the past 30 odd years is Harry Krikorian and he generally has several fine vintage pocket watches in his inventory. His website is https://www.estateandfinejewelry.store

  7. #36
    Join Date
    17th October 22
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    Ingersoll Triumph, Elgin, Gruen and Sandoz/Admiral (my personal favorite because I'm a Sandoz ) come to mind as well.

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