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  1. #11
    Join Date
    7th February 11
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    Interesting, how many of us are re-reading old favourites.
    Rev'd Father Bill White: Retired Parish Priest & Elementary Headmaster, lover of God, people (most of them!) dogs, joy, humour & clarity. Legion Padre, theologian, teacher, philosopher, linguist, traditionalist, bon-vivant, encourager of hearts & souls & a firm believer in dignity, decency, & duty. A proud Canadian Sinclair.

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  3. #12
    Join Date
    21st May 08
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    Inverness-shire, Scotland & British Columbia, Canada
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    I am re-reading (for the umpteenth time) Austin Tappan Wright's utopian novel 'Islandia'. Published in 1942, after his death, it's a detailed history of an imagined country complete with geography, genealogy, language, culture and literature. For those who wish for utopia in these poor times (and can move themselves in mind back to 1905) this is a fine read. Obviously I like it: I've two dog-eared second editions and a pristine first . And several follow-ons not quite up to the superb work of ATW.

    Spelling off, I am also reading 'Chasing the Deer: Hunting Iconography, Literature and Tradition of the Scottish Highlands' the 2007 doctoral thesis of Andrew EM Wiseman, and 'Burghead, Moray: a History of archeological thought' a Masters dissertation by Christine I. Clerk, 2019, and have just finished 'Macpherson Country: genealogical identities, spatial histories...' by Paul Basu.

  4. #13
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    Panache is offline
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    Gentleman of X Marks

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    If you have the right book the time just flies. In the last two weeks I started and finished

    "Can't Wait to Get to Heaven" By Fannie Flagg (Which I HIGHLY recommend for anyone needing something to lift their spirits and make them smile)

    "Song of Achilles", Madeline Miller's take on the Greek Hero and the Legend of the Trojan War. I enjoyed it so much that I have dived into her second novel "Circe" that will look at the legend of Odysseus from the title character's perspective.

    Cheers

    Jamie
    -See it there, a white plume
    Over the battle - A diamond in the ash
    Of the ultimate combustion-My panache

    Edmond Rostand

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  6. #14
    Join Date
    30th September 08
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    Texas histories...

    I’m currently reading S.C. Gwynne’s “Empire of the Summer Moon,” the story of Quanah Parker and the rise and fall of the Comanches; and “God Favors the Bold: Voices of the Texas Navy 1836–1845,” a series of previously unpublished diary, journal entries and after action reports from sailors and officers of the first and second Texian navies compiled by Michelle M. Haas.

    Good reads both!

    SM
    Shaun Maxwell
    Vice President & Texas Commissioner
    Clan Maxwell Society

  7. #15
    Join Date
    21st May 08
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    Inverness-shire, Scotland & British Columbia, Canada
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    Gwynne’s 'Empire...' is a good read, I think, for Americans, Shawn. I'm not so sure from the rest of the Scots-thinking world. Good to have it in the mix, though.

    Thanks for the introduction to 'God favours the bold...".

  8. #16
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    2nd January 10
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    Emergency Tour - 3 PARA in South Armagh (1976) by Brigadier Peter Morton.

    It was my first tour and so, very poignant in many ways.

  9. #17
    Join Date
    22nd October 17
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    Beijing
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    So many of these are great books that I have read. Of course, I have read the Hobbit, both on my own and aloud to my son.

    "Circe" was a great read. I picked it up at a bookstore in Roskilde, Denmark. My copy is currently on loan to my son's girlfriend, who is a doctor on the front lines of the pandemic in the USA.

    "A Voyage Long and Strange" was a really interesting book. I also strongly recommend Horwitz's "Confederates in the Attic" for an interesting look at the many ways the Civil War continues to crop up in modern life.

    "Empire of the Summer Moon" is fabulously well written and tells a story of a radically different time in America. I often use a short excerpt from the book to help my students understand the perspective of cultures with more animistic or magical views of the world.

    I am on my Chinese New Year break, so I am having a little extra time to read as well. I have three books going:
    "Japan and the Shackles of the Past" by R. Taggart Murphy is an intriguing exploration of the ways in which Japan's unique history has shaped its current social, political, and economic situation. The author argues that the topic should be important to a wide variety of readers, since the issues currently facing Japan (stagnant economy, aging population, low birth rate, etc.) will soon become concerns in many other industrialized countries--particularly the US and China.

    "Little Town on the Prairie" is one of the famous Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder. As a middle school teacher, I am always looking for material I can use in my classroom, and this book is certainly written at an accessible level and style for my students. However, I will have to give a lot of background information if we use it in class, since pioneer America is a very different place from today's urban China, which is the only world my kids know.

    "The Writing Revolution" is a great book on teaching students to think more deeply and critically by having them write across all their academic classes. It is full of useful advice, activities, and resources that teachers can implement right away. This sets it apart from many books on education, which tend to be heavy on buzzwords and theory and light on stuff you can actually do in class.

    As an English teacher, I am very glad to see so many people reading

    Andrew

  10. #18
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    Just arrived and am getting into "The Black Watch and the Great War" by Fraser Brown and Derek J. Patrick. It's a look at the BW in WW1 but authors not only relied on historical information but, also contacted relatives of soldiers written about. There's a whole chapter dedicated to the pipers who rose to the occasion in battle. Reading this book you feel how personal this war was to the families they interviewed.

  11. #19
    Join Date
    28th November 20
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    Quote Originally Posted by kilted redleg View Post
    Just arrived and am getting into "The Black Watch and the Great War" by Fraser Brown and Derek J. Patrick. It's a look at the BW in WW1 but authors not only relied on historical information but, also contacted relatives of soldiers written about. There's a whole chapter dedicated to the pipers who rose to the occasion in battle. Reading this book you feel how personal this war was to the families they interviewed.
    The losses of the Black Watch in the last century and this are still keenly felt in my home town of Dundee. A memorial for the men who served in the Regiment in the Second World War overlooks the city.

    Regards EEM.
    "Humanity is an aspiration, not a fact of everyday life."

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