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  1. #1
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    Glengarry Pattern

    Does anyone have a link to a free Glengarry pattern or one that is for sale via downloadable epattern?
    I've searched the forum and one that was linked to is no longer working.
    Alternatively a commercial pattern from one of the Big 4?
    There are a few available but now that the AUD has gone down, down, down its just not viable to order any more as postage is a killer (what's with the horrendous postage costs in the USA?)

  2. #2
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    That's a tough one!

    I would say to get a well-made Robert Mackey Glengarry and derive the pattern from that.

    I doubt that a commercial pattern from McCalls or Simplicity or what have you would have the correct shape. All of the patterns I've seen, of stuff I know about, like Scottish jackets and historical military jackets and so forth, have had entirely the wrong cut.

    A quick Google produced this. The hat itself is pretty good, though certainly lower than the Glengarries of the 1850s, but as you see the cockade is oddly shaped and too far forward

    http://www.amazon.com/1850s-1860s-Gl.../dp/B009SX3M2S

    The early Glengarries from the 1840s were higher than today's, then by the 1860s they had evolved to our modern shape. In between, in the 1870s through around 1900, they got smaller and lower and skimpier, before returning to their old 1860s size.

    Of course Glengarries aren't cut from woven cloth and sewn together, they're knit and shaped. Anything pieced together from woven yardage wouldn't be a "Glengarry" per se, but an approximation, or costume version, of one, it seems to me.
    Last edited by OC Richard; 6th December 15 at 06:24 AM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  4. #3
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    Thanks OC Richard
    I'd seen that pattern but it's rather small and designed to perch on a woman's head amongst buns & curls. I'm going for the modern shape used by pipe bands.
    So I've decided to play with some heavy black boiled wool from the stash to see what happens and whilst looking for a knitting pattern for a glengarry my research led me to a Hummel Bonnet and I plumbed the depths of the craft library and found a pattern from Pieceworks Magazine 2003. I'll give them both a go for interest and experimentations sake.
    It's for a friend who thinks he's a 'dandy' (his words not mine) I think he just likes to go out dressed up for attention.... But he's a great model for my experiments!

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by OC Richard View Post
    That's a tough one!

    I would say to get a well-made Robert Mackey Glengarry and derive the pattern from that.

    I doubt that a commercial pattern from McCalls or Simplicity or what have you would have the correct shape. All of the patterns I've seen, of stuff I know about, like Scottish jackets and historical military jackets and so forth, have had entirely the wrong cut.

    A quick Google produced this. The hat itself is pretty good, though certainly lower than the Glengarries of the 1850s, but as you see the cockade is oddly shaped and too far forward

    http://www.amazon.com/1850s-1860s-Gl.../dp/B009SX3M2S

    The early Glengarries from the 1840s were higher than today's, then by the 1860s they had evolved to our modern shape. In between, in the 1870s through around 1900, they got smaller and lower and skimpier, before returning to their old 1860s size.

    Of course Glengarries aren't cut from woven cloth and sewn together, they're knit and shaped. Anything pieced together from woven yardage wouldn't be a "Glengarry" per se, but an approximation, or costume version, of one, it seems to me.
    Richard:

    I got one of the hats from this fellow when he made them, as well as selling the pattern. The cap was a little small, in terms of the panels on the long sides. The ribbon was quite short, as well. If I can find it, I will post a photo.

    JMB

  6. #5
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    Keep in mind that the Glengarry originally wasn't a separate sort of hat; it's an ordinary bonnet which has been blocked to shape.

    It's nature is more clearly seen in some earlier photographs:







    This is one of the earliest depictions, and worn by a civilian to boot. Note how tall the early Glengarries often were. You can clearly see that it's a knit bonnet which has been shaped.



    By the 1860s it had assumed the form it still has today

    Last edited by OC Richard; 7th December 15 at 04:28 PM.
    Proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; son of the Revolution and Civil War; first Europeans on the Guyandotte

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  8. #6
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    You are a very bad influence on me OC
    The Hummel is boring I decided .... so I'm attempting a knitted Glengarry.... Pottering on that.
    I did manage to massacre a Vogue men's pattern and have a "sort of" glengarry made that I have to get the ribbon for .... Naturally there is nothing suitable amongst my huge stash, (unless I use hot pink)
    While researching I've found some fab pictures & information from the Museum of Victoria, so I'm posting those!

    Serious question.
    What is the approximate length of split on the back? (where the ribbons go & is used for adjustment)
    To the top of the dicing?
    Just the bottom band?
    Whatever/personal preference?
    Thanks

  9. #7
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    #2 Lefty!
    "We are all connected...to each other, biologically; to the earth, chemically; to the universe, atomically...and that makes me smile." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

  10. #8
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    That was a bit of fun.
    Knitted

    Felted


    Given that I just grabbed wool from the stash (about 6 different types) and cast on, I'm rather happy with the results.
    It's far to long but otherwise for a first attempt it's fine

  11. The Following 2 Users say 'Aye' to Lady Grey For This Useful Post:


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