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  1. #1
    Join Date
    15th October 12
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    Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland
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    How to make a tartan waistcoat cut on the bias to wear with a kilt

    Normal waistcoats to go with a kilt are too long, they interfere with the top of the sporran. And kilt length waistcoat sewing patterns are not available so I've had to draft up my own. Its about 3 inches shorter than a normal waistcoat. I've used a proper kilt length waistcoat as a reference.
    003.jpg
    I draft up my patterns digitally first of all using google sketchup. Itís a great way of getting the pattern perfect, and saves all your work making it easy to tweak. So in future I can draft up the pattern in other sizes quickly.
    sketchup.jpg
    Itís also a great way of previsualizing what the end result will look like
    waistcoat previz.jpg
    Itís then very quick a simple to draft up the physical pattern onto card.
    002.jpg
    Then I lay the cardboard templates onto the tartan and draw around them with chalk
    010 (2).jpg
    Its trickier than you may think: Both halves need to be symmetrical otherwise it would look awful. I'm using the centre block of the tartan (they grey element with 8 dark stripes crossing through it) at the middle of the centre front of the waistcoat, so there's only a few places on the fabric the pieces can possibly go. Also, the grain lines on the panels need to all be going the same way.
    011.jpg
    I then use a rotary cutter to cut the pieces out, and see! perfectly symmetrical! I'm very happy with that.
    013.jpg
    Next I use the templates again to cut out some interfacing. This is a fusible interlining that you apply with an iron. It gives the panel a bit more stiffness.
    014.jpg
    I then baste the chalk marks of the fitting darts that they're visible on the reverse.
    015.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    15th October 12
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    and then hand stitch the marks together on the wrong side of the fabric.
    016.jpg
    Press it, and then reinforce it with machine stitches.
    017.jpg
    it then then gets pressed flat towards the centre from of the panel.
    and the right side gets pressed as well.
    018.jpg
    I want the welts for the pockets to match in with the tartan as close as possible. Obviously though, as the panel has a dart running through it only half of the welt will match up to the tartan. So to do this I find where the welt will be located and cut out a cardboard template the size of the welt. Using a ruler I work off the tartan stripes of the fabric to get an idea of what the welt will look like.
    003 (2).jpg
    I then make a bigger template working off the tartan so that I can find the right place on the fabric.
    004.jpg
    Once I've found and cut of the fabric for the welt I apply a piece of fusible interlining the size of the welt for a bit of stiffness.
    005.jpg
    then it gets folded and halt, the narrow ends sewn, and the corners trimmed.
    006.jpg
    then turned to the right side
    007.jpg
    pressed.
    008.jpg
    and topstitched.
    009.jpg

  3. #3
    Join Date
    15th October 12
    Location
    Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland
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    it then gets sewn to the panel, right sides together, upside down.
    029.jpg
    next the pocket lining pieces and stitched to the outside of the fabric on the welt stitching line and above the welt.
    030.jpg
    The stitching marks are then used to draw out where the slashing lines are going to be to turn the pocket out to the right side. They're then cut.
    022 (2).jpg
    the pieces and then pressed back.
    031.jpg
    and the pocket lining pieces are pushed through to the correct side and sewn together.
    032.jpg
    now the welt can be pressed back to the right way up.
    033.jpg
    and hand stitched down.
    034.jpg
    not too bad I think.
    036.jpg
    Next I cut out the outside back lining piece and mark out the fitting darts.
    037.jpg
    Then I make the adjustment straps for the back. These are cut of lining, stitched, seam allowances and corners trimmed and turned to right side, pressed and topstitched.
    038.jpg
    Last edited by Bobby Gordon; 25th December 12 at 11:45 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    15th October 12
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    Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland
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    They're then sewn to the adjuster and the raw end sewn in place to go inside the fitting dart.
    039.jpg
    the same for the other side.
    040.jpg
    and then the fitting darts are stitched closed as before.
    041.jpg
    Now that the front and back outside panels are complete they can be pinned and stitched together at the shoulders.
    042.jpg
    and the shoulder seams are pressed open.
    043.jpg
    The next step is the inside lining. The front pieces are cut out and these too have fitting darts.
    044.jpg
    The facings are then pinned to the lining right sides together,
    045.jpg
    stitched,
    046.jpg
    and then then pressed open.
    047.jpg
    Now that the inside lining panels are complete they can be stitched, right sides together at the shoulder seams, and then pressed open.
    048.jpg

  5. #5
    Join Date
    15th October 12
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    Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland
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    Now comes the good bit. The outside is pinned to the inside
    049.jpg
    all the way around.
    050.jpg
    and all the seams are then sewn together, except the side seams. The seam allowances and the corners are then cut.
    051.jpg
    and then itís all pulled the right way round through one of the side seams. Itís starting to look a bit more like a waistcoat now!
    053.jpg
    Then the outside side seams are pinned together from the inside,
    054.jpg
    stitched, and then pressed open.
    055.jpg
    gets pressed. Itís starting to look really good!
    056.jpg
    Then the button placements are marked on the inside facing on the centre front at 2 inch intervals.
    057.jpg

  6. #6
    Join Date
    15th October 12
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    Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland
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    Then buttons are hand stitched on.
    058.jpg
    Next the buttonhole placements are marked on the centre front at 2 inch intervals.
    059.jpg
    These are keyhole buttonholes. The keyhole has to be punched out and the rest clipped,
    060.jpg
    and then it has to be hand sewn with a blanket stitch.
    061.jpg
    And then they buttoned up to make sure it all lines up.
    075.jpg
    et wallah! finished!!
    073.jpg
    074.jpg
    Very happy with that :0) :0) :0)
    080.jpg
    Can't wait to wear it!
    084.jpg
    090.jpg

  7. #7
    Join Date
    1st February 12
    Location
    Northeast Ohio, USA
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    This is outstanding. Well done!
    KEN CORMACK
    Clan Buchanan
    U.S. Coast Guard, Retired
    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, USA

  8. #8
    Join Date
    17th January 09
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    The Highlands of Norfolk, England
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    You make it look so easy! I am sure it can't be.

    Regards

    Chas

  9. #9
    Join Date
    10th June 10
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    What an incredible thread (and a very nice waistcoat)! Thank you for the step-by-step tutorial. Welt pockets were always a bit of a mystery to me, but your explanation and photos really clear things up for me.

    I hope to make myself a couple of similar waistcoats as my skills improve, so I'm sure I'll be revisiting this thread from time to time.

    Thank you for sharing!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    8th May 10
    Location
    Kent, OH
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    Very nice work, Bobby!!! About how long did this take you? Hours? Days? Weeks? And how were you able to figure yardage? How much material did you get for this? I'd love to try this, but I think I'll start on a solid color one first.

    Slŗinte!,
    Jon
    Last edited by Jon Lilley; 27th December 12 at 05:03 PM. Reason: I misspelled Bobby's name
    Only 9 notes. How hard could it be?

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