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  1. #1
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    17th June 15
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    Left side of a-shaped over apron?

    I'm not fully understanding what's going on on the left side of the over apron. Where do I sew to secure that edge? The X-kilt manual(2nd edition, written by Alan Hebert) says something about folding the raw edge under, but I'm pretty sure there isn't a raw edge on the left hand side. I consider a raw edge to be an edge that has an unhemmed cut in it. Maybe I'm misunderstanding?

    And another question: is a-shaping always done, or are there times when you would choose to have a squared off over apron?
    Last edited by eahuntley; 24th June 15 at 10:45 AM.

  2. #2
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    24th September 04
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    Victoria, BC Canada 48 25' 47.31"N 123 20' 4.59" W
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    may we ask, what manual are your referring to?
    Steve Ashton
    Forum Owner

  3. #3
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    Sorry. It's an X-kilt, and I'm using the 2nd edition of the manual written by Alan Hebert.

  4. #4
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    27th April 13
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    I haven't looked at the x kilt manual in a while but I think you're actually talking about the right hand edge of the apron. I leave extra fabric next to where I mark the aprons so I can fold it over and hide the raw edge when I stitch the apron edge. I can upload a photo when I get home if that'll help.

    i don't always taper aprons. If I'm making a kilt with a very narrow apron, say 10 inches, I don't taper it. The apron kicks out a bit and that's fine. Doesn't bother me and I explain it to my customers to make sure it's not an issue for them either.
    Last edited by ratspike; 24th June 15 at 01:30 PM.
    Cheers!
    Bob

  5. #5
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    Is that the edge of the apron at the left side when you are wearing it?

    If so then it is not sewn in as part of the fell but is free from waist to lower edge.

    There is a deep pleat beneath both aprons which gives easy movement to the wearer - should you happen to want to vault a gate or ride a bicycle for instance, and when sitting it allows the apron to fall between the thighs.

    That deep pleat can sometimes roll out, (always on mine) and I counter that by pulling the inner fold up just very slightly, so a long narrow triangle of double fabric is cocked up above the top of the apron. It pulls the pleat into the vertical as it is contending with being a two dimensional fold wrapped around a three dimensional shape.

    The A shape of the apron is created by an infolding of the edge of the apron, pushed in, not folded behind. The edge of the apron at the waist forms a W which reduces as it heads towards the lower edge of the fell. The point of the central /\ needs to drop down below the level of the top of the apron to allow that reduction - otherwise it would pull the infolding all the way to the lower edge.

    It is easier to show these tricks than to describe them, but if you tack the folds and wrap the kilt you can see how the fabric tries to conform to the body shape.

    Anne the Pleater :ootd:
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  6. #6
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    3rd June 15
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    That's interesting Anne, do you have a photo? I sew mine down to the fell line. (Love to see another method)
    Eahuntley... I gave up on A shaping the apron, it was just too much bother and I've been sewing for years. Tack things down, wrap it around you and see what you think? It's your X kilt, do what you wish!

  7. #7
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    I've opted to just go with a square apron, now that I see that's common. and it's only 10" anyhow.

    at first I was sure I was mistaking which side he was talking about, but I'm pretty sure the right side is the open side(where one might attach buckles or straps to close it), and the left side is the side that butts up against the pleats.

    I'm pretty much done with the complicated parts of the kilt I'm working on, and this was the last thing that was hanging me up.

    Just for reference, and to see if anyone else knows what he's talking about, here's the passage out of the manual:
    (everything below here is copied and pasted)

    Sewing Down the Over-Apron Edges

    Find the A-Shaping chalk line you drew for the right hand edge of the over-apron. “Right hand edge” this time refers to “right” as you’re looking at the kilt on the table, the hem/selvedge towards you. Make SURE that you’ve got the AShaping line, and not the square, measuring line! Fold that over from the hem all the way up to the waistband in a straight line and pin it. Don’t stop at the fell, go all the way to the waistband on this one. Now stitch that puppy down. Are you going to run two lines of stitching on the edges of your over-apron? I recommend it. If so, you should match that with two lines of stitching on the left side, too, BUT WAIT TO DO THIS UNTIL LATER, when you attach the over-apron strip. Go ahead and put two lines of stitching on the right side now, if you want. Make ‘em about a quarter of an inch apart. I recommend two lines of stitching anyway; it tends to stiffen up the edges of the apron and that’s a good thing, especially if you’re working with cotton/poly twill.
    Be sure you’re pinning/stitching along the A-SHAPING chalk lines you put in and the kilt is facing up, outside of kilt facing you, hem/selvedge towards you. If it’s not like this then all my right-left instructions in the above paragraph will be backwards!!
    Move over to the left-hand edge of the over-apron and fold over the left hand edge, following the A-SHAPING LINE. Fold it under twice so that the raw edge is buried. This will leave a substantial flap of material folded in towards the center of the apron. That’s good, it helps stiffen up the apron a bit. It’ll be narrower at the bottom than at the top because of the A-Shaping. No worries.
    OK, so pin down that folded-over edge and stitch it down about a quarter of an inch from the edge, matching the stitching pattern you used on the other edge of the apron but ONLY DO ONE LINE OF STITCHING FOR NOW. You should have at least an inch of extra material extending beyond the hem line, towards the middle of the over-apron, on the inside.
    Now you’ve got your over-apron!

  8. #8
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    This is the pull in/up on a rather deep pleat, in the under apron, which is identical except for being mirror imaged to the one on the apron.



    You will also be able to see that the apron is shaped at the top so as to curve inwards - the top edge is longer than the waistband so it needs to be eased in. When the waist edge is pulled tight under the strain of the buckle the fabric is not put under strain. That would be done for both the top of the apron and the outer layer of the band if using a tartan or patterned material, so they matched. The strain is taken by the inner core, usually military surplus webbing, or for a wide band, seatbelt material, some of which is visible in the background of the photo.

    Anne the Pleater. :ootd:
    Last edited by Pleater; 24th June 15 at 04:23 PM. Reason: additional information
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  9. The Following User Says 'Aye' to Pleater For This Useful Post:


  10. #9
    Join Date
    27th April 13
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    Quote Originally Posted by eahuntley View Post
    I've opted to just go with a square apron, now that I see that's common. and it's only 10" anyhow.

    at first I was sure I was mistaking which side he was talking about, but I'm pretty sure the right side is the open side(where one might attach buckles or straps to close it), and the left side is the side that butts up against the pleats.
    Remember that the manual has the fabric oriented with the hem facing towards you. The left hand edge of the apron while you've got the fabric on the table is actually the right hand edge of the apron when you eventually put the kilt on.
    Cheers!
    Bob

  11. #10
    Join Date
    17th June 15
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    Ahh, OK. That's the part I got turned around. It all makes sense now. Thanks.

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