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Thread: Sash making?

  1. #1
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    Question Sash making?

    If I'm interested in making a sash out of a Wallace Dress Blue tartan for my lady, (yes, I know it's usually used for dances and rarely seen), and rather than a fully traditional sash, it has to be good for a Ren Fair, though I am open to a traditional sash if it's affordable. How much fabric would I need for a traditional sash, and what techniques or recommendations does the rabble have for sashes?
    Aut Viam Inveniam Aut Faciam
    Proud Member of Clan Macpherson!
    "Touch not the cat bot a glove"

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    By my estimates, it would take somewhere around 2-3 yards of tartan to run the length of a sash. If you already have the tartan, you could find a pattern online or at a local fabric store. If you don't have it yet, it my be worth your while buying a finished one. Good tartan runs a wide array of prices. For the tartan you are looking for, I found it for around $75-85 USD/yrd. Aside from the expense, there is also the tedium of hand fringing the ends. I found a made to order sash offered in Wallace Dress Blue for about $116 USD online. But that doesn't count shipping. But then again, I'm lazy. So what seems like a good idea to me, might not to you.
    Keep your rings charged, pleats in the back, and stay geeky!
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  4. #3
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    Are any sort of sashes traditional?

    I would have said that the sash is Victorian, and the arisich is the garment with a tradition - that is how it is said, the spelling is arisaid, though how they work out the writing down and reading of Gaelic is beyond me.

    From what I have read there are few rules at Ren fairs anyway, so you can be creative with what you have.

    Anne the Pleater :ootd:
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

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  6. #4
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    Renfair is to renaissance/medieval reenactment as Steampunk is to Victorian/Edwardian reenactment. When I mentioned "traditional", I was referring to it's place in modern Highland ladies attire. It seems to be the most common form of tartan display for the more conservative lady-folk. For her c1610 kit, my wife wears an arisad with what would otherwise be considered an English kit. Note to self: Get some pictures of her in that kit.
    Keep your rings charged, pleats in the back, and stay geeky!
    https://kiltedlantern.wixsite.com/kiltedlantern

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  8. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Didymous View Post
    By my estimates, it would take somewhere around 2-3 yards of tartan to run the length of a sash. If you already have the tartan, you could find a pattern online or at a local fabric store. If you don't have it yet, it my be worth your while buying a finished one. Good tartan runs a wide array of prices. For the tartan you are looking for, I found it for around $75-85 USD/yrd. Aside from the expense, there is also the tedium of hand fringing the ends. I found a made to order sash offered in Wallace Dress Blue for about $116 USD online. But that doesn't count shipping. But then again, I'm lazy. So what seems like a good idea to me, might not to you.
    If you can tell me, where do you find one at that cost?
    Aut Viam Inveniam Aut Faciam
    Proud Member of Clan Macpherson!
    "Touch not the cat bot a glove"

  9. #6
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    I think this may be one of those times when we are tripping over words.

    To most people the words Ladies Sash could mean anything from a very small shoulder sash about 5" X 24" to a short sash about 9" X 54" also worn draped over one shoulder, up to a long sash about 11" X 110"worn over one shoulder and pinned at the opposite hip.

    If you are talking about a sash worn by a man you are usually talking about a pipers sash. These are huge and take almost as much fabric and time to make as a kilt.

    I could help a bit more if you could describe a little better what it is you are looking for. Do you have, or know of, any pictures of what you are looking for?
    Steve Ashton
    www.freedomkilts.com
    Skype (webcam enabled) thewizardofbc
    I wear the kilt because:
    Swish + Swagger = Swoon.

  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Wizard of BC View Post
    I think this may be one of those times when we are tripping over words.

    To most people the words Ladies Sash could mean anything from a very small shoulder sash about 5" X 24" to a short sash about 9" X 54" also worn draped over one shoulder, up to a long sash about 11" X 110"worn over one shoulder and pinned at the opposite hip.

    If you are talking about a sash worn by a man you are usually talking about a pipers sash. These are huge and take almost as much fabric and time to make as a kilt.

    I could help a bit more if you could describe a little better what it is you are looking for. Do you have, or know of, any pictures of what you are looking for?
    The short sash you described is the ideal, though I am open to the other two as well as a scarf made with the Wallace Dress Blue tartan.
    Aut Viam Inveniam Aut Faciam
    Proud Member of Clan Macpherson!
    "Touch not the cat bot a glove"

  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by OKSooner View Post
    If you can tell me, where do you find one at that cost?
    Now bear in mind that the price above doesn't include shipping. Also, though this site may not be the best of the best, I have bought a couple of kilts from them and have been pleased with what I bought.

    http://www.heritageofscotland.com/Sa...p#.VOpsfsJ0zIU
    Keep your rings charged, pleats in the back, and stay geeky!
    https://kiltedlantern.wixsite.com/kiltedlantern

  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Didymous View Post
    Renfair is to renaissance/medieval reenactment as Steampunk is to Victorian/Edwardian reenactment. When I mentioned "traditional", I was referring to it's place in modern Highland ladies attire. It seems to be the most common form of tartan display for the more conservative lady-folk. For her c1610 kit, my wife wears an arisad with what would otherwise be considered an English kit. Note to self: Get some pictures of her in that kit.
    You mean - she shows her - limbs?

    Sharp intake of breath

    Uncovered ankles, and a married woman too?

    Swoon.

    Anne the Pleater
    I presume to dictate to no man what he shall eat or drink or wherewithal he shall be clothed."
    -- The Hon. Stuart Ruaidri Erskine, The Kilt & How to Wear It, 1901.

  13. #10
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    No, her attire is quite matronly.
    Keep your rings charged, pleats in the back, and stay geeky!
    https://kiltedlantern.wixsite.com/kiltedlantern

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