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  1. #1
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    Clan Heraldry: What you can and can't wear and display

    A very interesting article posted on ScotClans I gather in advance of the gathering this summer.

    This will ruffle a few feathers I think.

    Coming to Scotland in 2014? Attending a Clan or Family Gathering? Want to get it right? Well aware that feathers may be ruffled and noses out-jointed, Dr Bruce Durie, Shenachie to the Chief of Durie, offers this straightforward guide…

    http://www.clans2014.com/clan-herald...r-and-display/
    President, Clan Buchanan Society International

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  3. #2
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    Great link - Thanks.

    The whole article should be made into a Word Document and made a sticky, so it can always be referred to and quoted.

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  5. #3
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    " But informally, most Chiefs are only too happy to see as many people as possible wearing the Crest Badge."
    Though that is, strictly speaking, "illegal" in the eyes of Lyon Court.
    Alan

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    Just curious, which part of this straight forward sensible link is likely to "ruffle feathers"?
    Orionson
    "I seek not to follow in the footsteps of the men of old.
    I seek the things they sought." ~ Basho

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  8. #5
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    And I suppose I should point out, to avoid some confusion, but literally none of these laws apply here in the States other than a few regarding the weapons. And even then it is usually a jurisdictional matter.
    We go by tradition but tend to create our own as well.
    President, Clan Buchanan Society International

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chas View Post
    Great link - Thanks.

    The whole article should be made into a Word Document and made a sticky, so it can always be referred to and quoted.
    I couldn't agree more, Chas! Clear and concise. Excellent article.

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  11. #7
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    Orionson



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    Just curious, which part of this straight forward sensible link is likely to "ruffle feathers"?



    I took that as a humorous nod to the chief's feathers.

  12. #8
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    I can't speak for Dr. Durie. As for my reference, I was not aware that Bruce, Douglas etc. were technically not clans. At the clan villages here in the States they always appear to refer to themselves as such. Now, perhaps the clan society members are all aware of this, but I doubt it. My guess is it would be met with surprise and probably a few ruffled feathers.
    President, Clan Buchanan Society International

  13. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by neloon View Post
    " But informally, most Chiefs are only too happy to see as many people as possible wearing the Crest Badge."
    Though that is, strictly speaking, "illegal" in the eyes of Lyon Court.
    Alan
    How is it illegal in the eyes of Lyon Court, when it's on Lyon's webpage here:
    "What is permitted is for a member of a clan to use the clan crest ."

    which links to here:

    "Clansmen and clanswomen
    These are the Chief's relatives, including his own immediate family and even his eldest son, and all members of the extended family called the "Clan", whether bearing the Clan surname or that of one of its septs; that is all those who profess allegiance to that Chief and wish to demonstrate their association with the Clan.

    It is correct for these people to wear their Chiefs Crest encircled with a strap and buckle bearing their Chief’s Motto or Slogan. The strap and buckle is the sign of the clansman, and he demonstrates his membership of his Chiefs Clan by wearing his Chief’s Crest within it.
    "
    John

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  15. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctbuchanan View Post
    I can't speak for Dr. Durie. As for my reference, I was not aware that Bruce, Douglas etc. were technically not clans. At the clan villages here in the States they always appear to refer to themselves as such. Now, perhaps the clan society members are all aware of this, but I doubt it. My guess is it would be met with surprise and probably a few ruffled feathers.
    I have seen that too at various games and gatherings. It is my understanding that this tends to happen quite often in our modern era where it seems that just about every Scottish or Irish surname, regardless of its origin and history, is titled, "Clan ________." I think for some people, especially Americans, become a wee bit desperate to belong to something larger than themselves (I'm not saying there is anything wrong with that ideal) and the romantic notion of belonging to (no matter how remote it may be) a particular Scottish or Irish "clan" is absolutely wonderful. Add the opportunity to wear the kilt and Highland Dress into the equation and the whole idea becomes almost irresistable. Of course, the clans (close-knit tribes with their "associated families/septs") of Scotland were primarily of Highland origin. You often hear, "Highland Clans" and "Lowland Families" to further differentiate the two, and rightly so. Naturally, any extended family with close kinship may be referred to as a clan, since the word itself is derived from the Gaelic word clanna, meaning "children" and is used to describe various groups of close-knit, people that share a common ancestor. Arguably, I believe the word is most closely associated with the Scottish Highlands, the Highland people and Highland culture more than any other geographical location.

    I can say with certainty that within the structure, heritage and cultural/tribal traditions of the Clan Macpherson, we often use the Scottish Gaelic word of sliochd, which means "race of, tribe, descendents, or even clan." A sliochd is a bit like an associated family/sept, but not quite, since the sliochd within the clan are already Macphersons to begin with and are related to the Chief. Sliochd is a wee bit more like a "clan within a clan," or a cadet branch that accurately designates and differentiates one group of Macphersons from the next, since some families may be more "prominent" than others, which is largely dependent upon their genealogy and how closely related they are to the Chief and his immediate family.

    Example:

    "The Genealogy: Structure and Evolution of the Clan Macpherson

    The Invereshie Book Genealogy is a remarkable document. It contains so much information about the organisation of the Clan Macpherson by blood descent, marriage and territorial holding that it is virtually a manual on the anatomy of the Clan Macpherson. As such it is probably unique in Highland archives, and must be regarded as the principal document upon which any future history of the clan must be founded.

    The document announces itself with the title, "The Genealogies of the Macphersons since the Three Bretheren from whom the family is called Sliochd an triùir Bhàithrean." It is organised in three parts; one for the descendants or sliochd of each of the brothers, and each part extends through ten to twelve generations, from about 1350 when Ewan, father of the three brothers, was living, to about 1700. The procedure adopted in each part is to trace the senior family patrilineally, that is, from father to son, mentioning daughters and younger sons from whom branches of the family descended, and then to trace the descent of the branches from the oldest to the youngest in turn.

    Kenneth, the first of the three brothers, is introduced as “Kenneth, eldest lawful son of Ewan Macpherson of Cluny." His sliochd is then followed to Duncan Macpherson of Cluny who died in 1722. The genealogist continues with the statement: “Having spoken of the posterity of Kenneth Macpherson in a direct line, now remains to speak of the severall branches descended lineally of the said Kenneth, and I shall begin with them as they gradually descended of the said stock.” The oldest branches of “Sliochd Kynich” (Sliochd Choinnich) were “Clan vic Ewan duy” (Clann Mhic Eóghain Duibh), “Clan vic Ewan Taylor” (Clann Mhic Eóghain Tàillear), and the family of Brin: these he dismisses with the comment that he has "at present no particular and gradual genealogy." He then proceeds to describe the detailed genealogies of the Macphersons of Essich, Crubenmore‐Breakachie and Nessintullich, Pourie, Bellachroan, Ardbrylach and Glengoynack‐Pitmain, Blaragie‐beg, Crathie‐Croy, Pittourie, Old Dalrady, Kingussie‐beg‐Laggan, Nood [Nuide] and Benchar.

    It was from Nood [Nuide], the youngest and closest branch of Sliochd Choinnich that the present line of Macpherson chiefs sprang in the eighteenth century. The descent from John, the second of the three brothers, begins with an account of the Macphersons of Glenelg and Rothiemurchus, a family in Bealid, and another in “Strathern” [Strathdearn], representatives of which are mentioned as being contemporary with the genealogist. This is followed by full accounts of the Macphersons of Pitmain [Pitmean], Garvamore‐Inverroy and Shiromore, Bealid, Coronach and Invernahaun [Invernahavon], Stramasie [Strathmashie], Tirfodown, Invertromie, Pitchirn and Cluny.

    The descent from Gillès (Gillies), third of the three brothers, gives a detailed description of the Macphersons of Invereshie, New Dalrady and Killihuntly, Knappach, Phoyness [Phoness], Coraldie and Etterish.

    The three major divisions of the clan are listed as “Sliochd Kynich” (Kenneth), “Sliochd Iain” (John), and “Sliochd Gilliosa” (Sliochd Ghill‐Iosa, Gilles), and there is plenty of corroborating evidence in the records of the seventeenth century, and in the manner in which the officer corps of Ewan Macpherson of Cluny's (Cluny of the '45) regiment in the Jacobite Rising of 1745 was organised, to show that these were indeed functional divisions. The patrilineal structure of Sliochd an trùir Bhráithrean is illustrated in the accompanying diagrams (pp 19, 31). It should be noted that the surname and territorial designation “Macpherson of Cluny”, as applied to Ewan, the father of the three brothers, is being applied retroactively by the genealogist: the surname was not in use till the early fifteenth century, and Cluny was acquired even later. Both John and Gilles are mentioned as sons of "Ewan Macpherson, Chieftain of the Clanchattan," a title contested between the Macphersons of Cluny and the Mackintosh chiefs. Sir Aeneas Macpherson of Invereshie, FSA (Scot), was an eminence gris behind Duncan Macpherson of Cluny in one phase of this contest before the Whig Revolution sent him on his travels, but the tribal designation may have some validity..."


    -Dr. Alan G. Macpherson, of St. John's, Newfoundland, Clan Macpherson Historian

    Heraldic shields (escutcheon) of Clan Macpherson Armigers, located at the Clan Macpherson Museum and House in Newtonmore, Inverness-shire, Scotland. Hand painted by Roderick Gordon Murdoch Macpherson, CM, FRHSC, FRSA, FSA (Scot), Niagara Herald Extraordinary.
    Last edited by creagdhubh; 13th February 14 at 12:24 PM. Reason: Typo.

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